venulitis

venulitis

 [ven″u-li´tis]
inflammation of the venules.
cutaneous necrotizing venulitis a necrotizing vasculitis affecting the venules of the skin, usually of the extremities, caused by deposition of circulating immune complexes and usually occurring in association with infection, chronic disease, and drug administration. Clinical manifestations are variable, the most common being palpable purpura (the characteristic lesion), angioedema, and urticaria.
References in periodicals archive ?
Histological examination of the resected omentum demonstrated both arteritis and more severe venulitis, focal necrotizing vasculitis of the venules, and palisading granuloma (Figures 3(a) and 3(c)).
(5,6) Characteristics of these diseases include a high proportion of IgG4-positive plasma cells, predominantly T-lymphocytic infiltrate, storiform fibrosis, and venulitis. (13) These features were not seen in our case.
Microscopic features include dense periductal lymphoplasmacytic inflammation, fibrosis and obliterative venulitis. Other features may include arteritis and so called "granulocytic epithelial lesions" (granulocytic periductal and ductal inflammation with or without rupture and destruction of the ductal epithelium).
In addition, we saw involvement of the adventitial micro-vasculature, similar to the adventitial venulitis described in a case of IgG4-related aortitis, (3) as well as involvement of several other organs.
Histopathological investigation of AIP typically reveals dense periductal lymphoplasmacytic inflammation, periductal and parenchymal fibrosis, and obliterative venulitis (8).
The dense, plasma cell-rich inflammation centered on the pancreatic ducts, along with venulitis, can extend into the peripancreatic adipose tissue and create a clinical picture of a pseudotumor.
In this study, Yamashita et al (8) reported 3 patients with interstitial lymphoplasmacytic interstitial infiltrates associated with arteritis and venulitis. One patient was asymptomatic, whereas 2 others reported dyspnea.
In brief, paraduodenal chronic pancreatitis is characterized by inflammatory, cystic, and fibrotic changes in the duodenal wall and the adjacent pancreatic tissue near the minor papilla, while autoimmune pancreatitis4 typically shows lymphoplasmacytic periductal infiltration, perilobular and sometimes diffuse cell-rich sclerosis, and venulitis. (6) Moreover, in approximately 50% of the cases, the plasma cells stain for immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4), while the IgG4-negative cases show granulocytic epithelial lesions.