lateral ventricle

(redirected from ventriculus lateralis)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

ventricle

 [ven´trĭ-k'l]
a small cavity or chamber, as in the brain or heart.
ventricle of Arantius
1. the rhomboid fossa, especially its lower end.
fourth ventricle a median cavity in the hindbrain, containing cerebrospinal fluid.
ventricle of larynx the space between the true and false vocal cords.
lateral ventricle the cavity in each cerebral hemisphere, derived from the cavity of the embryonic tube, containing cerebrospinal fluid.
left ventricle the lower chamber of the left side of the heart, which pumps oxygenated blood out through the aorta to all the tissues of the body.
Morgagni's ventricle ventricle of larynx.
pineal ventricle an extension of the third ventricle into the stalk of the pineal body.
right ventricle the lower chamber of the right side of the heart, which pumps venous blood through the pulmonary trunk and arteries to the capillaries of the lung.
third ventricle a narrow cleft below the corpus callosum, within the diencephalon between the two thalami.

lat·er·al ven·tri·cle

[TA]
a cavity shaped somewhat like a horseshoe in conformity with the general shape of the cerebral hemisphere; each lateral ventricle communicates with the third ventricle through the interventricular foramen of Monro, and expands from there forward into the frontal lobe as the anterior horn as well as caudally over the thalamus as the central part (cella media) or body that, behind the thalamus, curves anteriorly and laterally, then forward into the temporal lobe as the inferior horn; from the apex of the curve (the atrium of the lateral ventricle) a variably sized posterior horn extends back into the white matter of the occipital lobe. The large choroid plexus of the lateral ventricle invades the body, atrium, and inferior horn (but not the anterior and posterior horns) from the medial side.

lat·er·al ven·tri·cle

(lat'ĕr-ăl ven'tri-kĕl) [TA]
A cavity in the brain shaped somewhat like a horseshoe in conformity with the general shape of the hemisphere; each lateral ventricle communicates with the third ventricle through the interventricular foramen of Monro, and expands from there forward into the frontal lobe as the anterior horn as well as caudally over the thalamus as the central part or cella media which, behind the thalamus, curves ventrally and laterally, then forward into the temporal lobe as the inferior horn; from the apex of the curve a variably sized posterior horn extends back into the white matter of the occipital lobe. The large choroid plexus of the lateral ventricle invades the central part of the lateral ventricle and the inferior horn (but not the anterior and posterior horn) from the medial side.