dysrhythmia

(redirected from ventricular dysrhythmia)
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Related to ventricular dysrhythmia: ventricular arrhythmias

dysrhythmia

 [dis-rith´me-ah]
disturbance of rhythm, such as of brain waves or the heartbeat.
cerebral dysrhythmia (electroencephalographic dysrhythmia) disturbance or irregularity in the rhythm of the brain waves as recorded by electroencephalography.

dys·rhyth·mi·a

(dis-ridh'mē-ă),
Defective rhythm. See also entries under rhythm Compare: arrhythmia.
[dys- + G. rhythmos, rhythm]

dysrhythmia

/dys·rhyth·mia/ (dis-rith´me-ah)
1. disturbance of rhythm.
2. an abnormal cardiac rhythm; the term arrhythmia is usually used, even for abnormal but regular rhythms.dysrhyth´mic

cerebral dysrhythmia , electroencephalographic dysrhythmia a disturbance or irregularity in the rhythm of the brain waves as recorded by electroencephalography.

dysrhythmia

(dĭs-rĭth′mē-ə)
n.
An abnormality in an otherwise normal rhythmic pattern, as of brain waves being recorded by an electroencephalograph.

dysrhythmia

[disrith′mē·ə]
any disturbance or abnormality in a normal rhythmic pattern, specifically, irregularity in the brain waves or cadence of speech. Compare arrhythmia.

dys·rhyth·mi·a

(dis-ridh'mē-ă)
Defective (abnormal) rhythm.
Compare: arrhythmia
[dys- + G. rhythmos, rhythm]

dysrhythmia

Any irregularity or disturbance of a normal body rhythm. The term is most commonly applied to the heart beat or the ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAM (EEG).

Arrhythmia or dysrhythmia

Abnormal rhythm in hearts that contract in an irregular way.
Mentioned in: Electrocardiography

dys·rhyth·mi·a

(dis-ridh'mē-ă)
Defective rhythm.
[dys- + G. rhythmos, rhythm]

dysrhythmia

disturbance of rhythm.
References in periodicals archive ?
The outcomes measured at 30 days included death from cardiovascular causes, ventricular dysrhythmias, nonfatal MI, recurrent chest pain, and recurrent cocaine use.
Of the 256 who were contacted directly, none had sustained ventricular dysrhythmias.
It has beep shown to be effective in both atrial and ventricular dysrhythmias and clear indications for its use have been established.
The most frequent indications were |resistant' atrial fibrillation (24%), malignant ventricular dysrhythmias (22%), and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (20%) in 49 patients aged between 70 and 92 years (mean: 80 years).
Eight patients developed serious ventricular dysrhythmias (sustained ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation) after admission; all responded to routine measures.
Clinical factors such as acute myocardial infarction and cardiomyopathy that contribute to ventricular remodeling and dilatation increase the frequency of ventricular dysrhythmias (Effat, 1995).