ventricular

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ventricular

 [ven-trik´u-ler]
pertaining to a ventricle.
ventricular septal defect a congenital heart defect in which the opening in the ventricular septum (normal in the fetus) persists after birth, in either the muscular or fibrous portion, most often due to failure of the bulbar septum to completely close the interventricular foramen. This permits flow of blood directly from one ventricle to the other, resulting in bypassing of the pulmonary circulation and varying degrees of cyanosis. Defective valves affecting the flow of blood to and from the heart may also be present.
Abnormal communication between the ventricles in ventricular septal defect. From Dorland's, 2000.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ven·tric·u·lar

(ven-trik'yū-lăr),
Relating to a ventricle, in any sense.
Synonym(s): ventricularis (1)
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ventricular

(vĕn-trĭk′yə-lər)
adj.
Of or relating to a ventricle or ventriculus.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ventricular

adjective Referring to a ventricle of the brain or heart.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ventricular

adjective Referring to a ventricle of the brain or heart
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ven·tric·u·lar

(ven-trik'yū-lăr)
Relating to a ventricle, in any sense.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ventricular

Pertaining to a VENTRICLE.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Berman, "Echocardiographic evidence of left ventricular bands in infants and children," Journal of the American College of Cardiology, vol.
Left ventricular bands and false tendons are usually course from the midportion of the interventricular septum to the free wall (anterolateral) of the left ventricle.
With ventricular obliteration, the medial edge of the ventricular bands usually becomes broad and swollen.