ventricular afterload

ven·tric·u·lar af·ter·load

formerly and erroneously, the arterial pressure or some other measure of the force that a ventricle must overcome while it contracts during ejection, contributed to by aortic or pulmonic artery impedance, peripheral vascular resistance, and mass and viscosity of blood; now, more rigorously expressed in terms of the wall stress, that is, the tension per unit cross-sectional area in the ventricular muscle fibers (calculated by an expansion of Laplace law using pressure, internal radius, and wall thickness) that is required to produce the intracavitary pressure required during ejection.

ven·tric·u·lar af·ter·load

(ven-trik'yū-lăr af'tĕr-lōd)
The sum total of the forces, both hemodynamic and mechanical, which the left ventricle of the heart must pump against to send oxygenated blood out into the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
The aim of treatment for ApHCM is mainly to control symptoms and prevent complications, which are done by means of medications such as beta-blockers or calcium-channel blockers to control the heart rate, and also ACEI to reduce the left ventricular afterload. Recent discovery also showed that ACEI will reduce the adverse cardiac remodeling and fibrosis in ApHCM.[3] For a patient who is persistently symptomatic or has high risk of sudden cardiac death, an ICD will be inserted.
It should be administered especially to those selected subjects who have increased right ventricular afterload, low risk of bleeding, and an expectation for a long survival time.
The most common pathologies, which leads to an increase in left ventricular afterload are systemic hypertension and aortic stenosis with the consequence to develop concentric hypertrophy.
Volume expansion versus norepinephrine in treatment of a low cardiac output complicating an acute increase in right ventricular afterload in dogs.
With progression of fetal pulmonary and systemic vasoconstriction, an increased right ventricular afterload and a shift of cardiac output to the left ventricle occur [8], with impact on left diastolic function and possible increased impedance to flow through the foramen ovale (FO) [14].
PH, if left untreated, can cause increased right ventricular afterload with right heart dilatation and failure, which is compounded by functional TR by annulus dilatation [16].
Due to early recognition of the disease and aggressive supportive care with mechanical ventilation, right ventricular afterload reduction, and blood transfusion, both patients survived without any significant sequelae.
Positive ventilation might influence the TAPSE by way of increasing right ventricular afterload.[sup][29] However, in this study, the PEEP and plateau pressures were not different between the two groups.
Choi et al., "Computational analysis of the effect of the type of LVAD flow on coronary perfusion and ventricular afterload," Journal of Physiological Sciences, vol.
The uteroplacental circulation and systemic vasodilatation contribute to the decline in vascular resistance, which is the steady component of ventricular afterload. Vascular resistance decreases in the early first trimester, presents its nadir in the middle of the second trimester, and returns close to prepregnancy levels within two weeks after delivery [11].
The i-cor system, which provides Synchronized Cardiac Assist, combines the best elements of cardiac assist and augmented cardiac function associated with IABP and percutaneous ventricular assist devices but does not increase left ventricular afterload or ventricular work.
Following extubation, inhaled iloprost was started at doses of 2.5 [micro]g, six times per day since iloprost is known to reduce residual postoperative PH, decrease right ventricular afterload, and may facilitate the early postoperative management after PEA.