ventral root


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root

 [roōt]
1. the descending and subterranean part of a plant.
2. that portion of an organ, such as a tooth, hair, or nail, that is buried in the tissues, or by which it arises from another structure, or the part of a nerve that is adjacent to the center to which it is connected.
Tooth anomalies with variations in root form. From Darby and Walsh, 1994.
anterior root the anterior, or motor, division of each spinal nerve, attached centrally to the spinal cord and joining peripherally with the posterior root to form the nerve before it emerges from the intervertebral foramen; it conveys motor fibers to skeletal muscle and contains preganglionic autonomic fibers at the thoracolumbar and sacral levels. Called also ventral root.
dorsal root posterior root.
motor root anterior root.
nerve r's the series of paired bundles of nerve fibers which emerge at each side of the spinal cord, termed dorsal (or posterior) or ventral (or anterior) according to their position. There are 31 pairs (8 cervical, 12 thoracic, 5 lumbar, 5 sacral, and 1 coccygeal), each corresponding dorsal and ventral root joining to form a spinal nerve. Certain cranial nerves, e.g., the trigeminal, also have nerve roots.
posterior root the posterior, or sensory, division of each spinal nerve, attached centrally to the spinal cord and joining peripherally with the anterior root to form the nerve before it emerges from the intervertebral foramen; each posterior root bears a spinal ganglion that conveys sensory fibers to the spinal cord. Called also dorsal root.
sensory root posterior root.
ventral root anterior root.

ventral root

n.
Either of the two roots of a spinal nerve, consisting of motor fibers and arising from the anterior section of the spinal cord.

ven·tral root

(ven'trăl rūt)
The motor root of a spinal nerve.

ventral root

any of the nerve roots issuing from the ventral side of the vertebrate brain or spinal cord, containing MOTOR nerves.
References in periodicals archive ?
The stimulus was applied to a more proximal ventral root (5 pulses at 100 Hz).
In contrast to ventral root stimulation, axonal tract stimulation did not evoke propagating bursts in any of the 12 experiments.
(2008) observed that in the cavy (Galea spixii), the femoral nerve originated from the ventral roots of L5 and L6, similar to that observed by Tonini et al.
Each spinal nerve is attached to the cord by structures called dorsal and ventral roots. (See Figure 9: Cross-section of the spinal cord showing the formation of the spinal nerve.

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