venous stasis


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stasis

 [sta´sis]
a stoppage or diminution of flow, as of blood or other body fluid, or of intestinal contents.
stasis syndrome overgrowth of bacteria within the small intestine resulting from a variety of conditions causing stasis, particularly disturbances to intestinal motility or decreased acid secretion, but also structural abnormalities such as diverticula, fistulae between the colon and upper bowel, or chronic obstruction; it is characterized by malabsorption of vitamin B12, steatorrhea, and anemia.
venous stasis cessation or impairment of venous flow, such as with venous insufficiency; see also stasis ulcer. Called also phlebostasis and venostasis.

ve·nous sta·sis

congestion and slowing of circulation in veins due to blockage by either obstruction or high pressure in the venous system, usually best seen in the feet and legs.

venous stasis

a disorder in which the normal flow of blood through a vein is slowed or halted.
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Venous stasis

venous stasis

Medtalk The pooling of venous blood in a particular region which, in the legs results in edema, hyperpigmentation and possibly ulceration

ve·nous sta·sis

(vēnŭs stāsis)
Congestion and slowing of circulation in veins due to blockage by either obstruction or high pressure in the venous system, usually best seen in the feet and legs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Catatonia-specific causes for venous stasis include immobility, prolonged use of physical restraints, and sedation as a side effect of antipsychotic use.
The veins enlarge greatly during pregnancy to accommodate increased blood volume and following childbirth, a period when venous stasis occurs.
Again considering venous stasis as a contributing factor to VTE, patient, specifically limb immobility after orthopaedic surgery increases the risk of DVT about tenfold (Heit et al 2001).
Among the four possible mechanisms by which varicocele results in male infertility stated in the Introduction part, venous stasis and testicular oxidative stress have been paid much attention in recent clinical studies (Cavallini et al.
Other factors hypothesized to increase DVT risk, specific to athletes, include slower blood flow associated with the chronic bradycardia observed in trained athletes, higher venous compliance, and compression of the venous structure by muscle hypertrophy, all of which may result in increased venous stasis (3).
They are: venous stasis, endothelial injury and alteration in coagulation.
Venous stasis causes blood pooling in the extremities, usually the leg veins.
Of these, venous stasis and hypercoagulability are thought to be the major contributing factors to development of thrombus formation and possible DVT (Merli et al 1993).
Under the supervision of a health-care professional, it is indicated for pressure ulcers, venous stasis ulcers, diabetic ulcers, first- and second-degree burns, skin tears, grafted wounds, donor sites, and surgical wounds where infection exists or threatens.
5 million people have pressure ulcers; 3) 1 million people have venous stasis (circulatory) ulcers; 4) 15 percent of all diabetics will develop chronic wounds; 5) Patients with diabetes have a 15-fold increase in the risk of amputation; 6) Approximately 60,000 diabetics will undergo amputation each year and wound care has grown to become a $2 billion market globally.
The multifactorial pathogenesis of VTE was first described by German pathologist Rudolf Virchow over a century ago as a combination of venous stasis (such as with iliac vein stenosis), blood vessel damage (during the replacement of a central venous catheter, for example) and hypercoagulation (due to hereditary causes, such as factor V Leiden, or acquired factors, such as the lupus anticoagulant or exposure to estrogen).