venous return


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return

 [re-tern´]
a coming back.
venous return the flow of blood into the heart from the peripheral vessels.

ve·nous re·turn

the amount of blood per unit of time returning to the heart through the great veins and coronary sinus.

venous return

the return of blood to the heart via the superior and inferior vena cava and the coronary sinus.

ve·nous re·turn

(vē'nŭs rĕ-tŭrn')
The blood returning to the heart through the great veins and coronary sinus; also used to describe venous drainage of a part of the body or particular organ.

venous return

the flow of blood from the whole body (except the lungs) via the great veins to the right side of the heart. Apart from minor beat-by-beat variations, this is equal at any one time to the cardiac output (from each of the ventricles), as the whole circulation, with the systemic and pulmonary components in series, is a closed loop. When heart rate increases and muscle supply vessels dilate in exercise, stroke volume is maintained (so that cardiac output is increased) by an increase in venous return, assisted by constriction of peripheral veins, reduction in the blood flow to the abdominal organs, and by the 'pumping' effects of increased depth of breathing (promoting flow into the thorax), and of the contracting muscles, which 'milk' blood along their local veins towards the heart.

venous return

blood, from venous circulation, returning to the heart via the venae cavae

ve·nous re·turn

(vē'nŭs rĕ-tŭrn')
Amount of blood per unit of time returning to heart through great veins and coronary sinus.

venous

pertaining to the veins.

venous dilatation
persistent dilatation of the vein but without necessarily any weakening of the wall or varicosity.
hepatic portal venous system
includes the veins from the alimentary tract, the portal vein, the sinusoids in the liver, the hepatic veins and then the entry into the caudal vena cava.
venous infarct
see venous infarct.
obstructed venous drainage
may be generalized or local; manifested by dilation, local edema.
orbital venous plexus
a plexus for venous drainage from the ophthalmic veins at the apex of the orbit; drains into the cavernous venous sinus within the cranium.
venous return
the flow of blood into the heart from the peripheral vessels.
venous return curves
relate venous return to atrial pressure; the inverse of the Starling relationship; an increase in atrial pressure decreases the venous return.
scleral venous plexus
a ring of small vessels around the corneal limbus which forms a link in the chain of vessels which drain the aqueous humor. Called also canal of Schlemm.
venous sinuses
see venous sinus.
venous system
the bodily system of veins commencing with the venae cavae, thence through the large veins and their tributaries, and immediately subsequent to the capillaries, the venules.
venous thrombosis
the presence of a thrombus in a vein. Originates in phlebitis in most cases. It is a major problem in horses because of the high incidence of jugular phlebitis and periphlebitis as a result of injection of irritating materials. See also caudal vena caval thrombosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The original shunt developed for this purpose had a 24F diameter, which decreased venous return to the point that mean arterial pressure dropped 50% and right atrial output by 30%.
The Fontan circulation was initiated by tightening the tourniquets at the levels of cannulas to divert the systemic venous return into the main pulmonary artery.
Loss of circulating volume in anaphylaxis is due to a combination of increased capillary permeability with fluid extravasation into the interstitial space and sequestration in grossly dilated vascular beds leading to a profound reduction in venous return.
Positive Airway Pressure: Use of positive pressure ventilation decreases the venous return during the positive pressure phase.
Although all three children eventually died, decompressive laparotomy and arrest of haemorrhage in the trauma patient restored venous return and enabled technically adequate extracorporeal life support.
INTRODUCTION: Spinal anesthesia for below umbilical surgery causes an almost inevitable sympathetic block and decreased venous return to the heart.
Moreover, with the Trendelenburg position, the abdominal contents may press on the diaphragm, increasing the intrathoracic pressure, which can interfere with the venous return in the IJV.
3) The condition is associated with reduced venous return from the ovary resulting in stromal edema congestion and internal hemorrhage.
Complications associated with percutaneous placement of venous return cannula for venovenous bypass in adult orthotopic liver transplantation.