venous return


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

return

 [re-tern´]
a coming back.
venous return the flow of blood into the heart from the peripheral vessels.

ve·nous re·turn

the amount of blood per unit of time returning to the heart through the great veins and coronary sinus.

venous return

the return of blood to the heart via the superior and inferior vena cava and the coronary sinus.

ve·nous re·turn

(vē'nŭs rĕ-tŭrn')
The blood returning to the heart through the great veins and coronary sinus; also used to describe venous drainage of a part of the body or particular organ.

venous return

the flow of blood from the whole body (except the lungs) via the great veins to the right side of the heart. Apart from minor beat-by-beat variations, this is equal at any one time to the cardiac output (from each of the ventricles), as the whole circulation, with the systemic and pulmonary components in series, is a closed loop. When heart rate increases and muscle supply vessels dilate in exercise, stroke volume is maintained (so that cardiac output is increased) by an increase in venous return, assisted by constriction of peripheral veins, reduction in the blood flow to the abdominal organs, and by the 'pumping' effects of increased depth of breathing (promoting flow into the thorax), and of the contracting muscles, which 'milk' blood along their local veins towards the heart.

venous return

blood, from venous circulation, returning to the heart via the venae cavae

ve·nous re·turn

(vē'nŭs rĕ-tŭrn')
Amount of blood per unit of time returning to heart through great veins and coronary sinus.

venous

pertaining to the veins.

venous dilatation
persistent dilatation of the vein but without necessarily any weakening of the wall or varicosity.
hepatic portal venous system
includes the veins from the alimentary tract, the portal vein, the sinusoids in the liver, the hepatic veins and then the entry into the caudal vena cava.
venous infarct
see venous infarct.
obstructed venous drainage
may be generalized or local; manifested by dilation, local edema.
orbital venous plexus
a plexus for venous drainage from the ophthalmic veins at the apex of the orbit; drains into the cavernous venous sinus within the cranium.
venous return
the flow of blood into the heart from the peripheral vessels.
venous return curves
relate venous return to atrial pressure; the inverse of the Starling relationship; an increase in atrial pressure decreases the venous return.
scleral venous plexus
a ring of small vessels around the corneal limbus which forms a link in the chain of vessels which drain the aqueous humor. Called also canal of Schlemm.
venous sinuses
see venous sinus.
venous system
the bodily system of veins commencing with the venae cavae, thence through the large veins and their tributaries, and immediately subsequent to the capillaries, the venules.
venous thrombosis
the presence of a thrombus in a vein. Originates in phlebitis in most cases. It is a major problem in horses because of the high incidence of jugular phlebitis and periphlebitis as a result of injection of irritating materials. See also caudal vena caval thrombosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Agitation and ventilator dysynchrony result in impaired venous return and aggravation of ICP.
In patients with anomalous pulmonary venous return, it is substantially difficult to evaluate pulmonary vein anatomy fully by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE).
Deep breathing exercises, especially diaphragmatic breathing exercises, aid venous return and also help to prevent chest complications following an anaesthetic
By effectively reducing venous return to the right ventricle, loop diuretics cause a reduced ventricular preload.
Rapid toss of large volumes of blood (greater than 30 percent of total blood volume) causes reduced venous return which cannot be compensated for in this manner.
The idea is to use the squeezing action of a contracted muscle to "clamp down" on blood vessels and slow venous return.
While this clearly impacts the active muscle(s), this vascular occlusion appears to reduce venous return as the increase in SV with exercise and increasing intensity of exercise is impaired with BFR (Figure 1).
Treatment of heat syncope entails increasing venous return, cooling, and fluids.
We present the case of a 7-week-old male with total anomalous pulmonary venous return and long-segment near-complete tracheal rings.
This leads to an acute rise in heart rate and venous return, but eventually causes blood pressure to reach a steady state.
9% saline interim period before dialysis is commenced If unable to aspirate 5 mL: * If lumen flushes but * Flush gently if no resistance does not aspirate, may as per unit policy indicate a clot or * Follow unit policy as to fibrin "flap" exists notification of MD or charge RN and it may be possible and observation for bleeding if to use the lumen for anticoagulant solution is venous return, instilled rather than aspirated according to unit policy End of * After retransfusion, perform a * "Scrubs" the treatment turbulent flush with a minimum catheter walls and of 10 mL 0.
Normal arterial supply, venous return, and the nutrient role of cerebrospinal fluid is slowly impaired.