venous access device


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VENOUS ACCESS DEVICES: A. An over-the-needle catheter; B. An inside-the-needle catheter.
Enlarge picture
VENOUS ACCESS DEVICES: A. An over-the-needle catheter; B. An inside-the-needle catheter.

venous access device

A specially designed catheter for gaining and maintaining access to the venous system. This device provides access for patients who require intravenous fluids or medications for several days or more, e.g., those having a bone marrow transplant or who are receiving long-term total parenteral nutrition. See: venous port
See: illustration
See also: device
References in periodicals archive ?
Totally implantable venous access devices implantation by cut-down or the puncture method was performed in the same fashion.
(11.) Ribeiro, R.C., et al., Long-term complications in totally implantable venous access devices: randomized study comparing subclavian and internal jugular vein puncture.
Managing Patients With Central Venous Access Devices
in 1979 which was subsequently modified and replaced by Broviac catheter.1 Since then, Hickman and Broviac catheters are being used most commonly.1,2 Central venous access devices are needed in the management of patients who need frequent blood products, antibiotics, blood sampling, prolonged surgical nutrition and chemotherapy.3-5 These catheters are tunnelled under the skin, but have an external exit site which require local care and is associated with a relatively high complication rate.6 Alternative devices have been developed in the hope of improving safety and acceptability.
Catheter tip position in the analysis on central venous access device outcome.
Wendy Jar is a Clinical Nurse Specialist in the Bone Marrow Transplant Unit at Christchurch District Health Board (CDHB) and is also involved in the on-going evolution of Central Venous Access Device (CVAD) management.
Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for central venous access device occlusion.
It is estimated that approximately 93% of patients receiving home intravenous therapies have a long-term central venous access device (CVAD) in place (Herbst, Kaplan, & McKinnon, 1998).
Venous access devices are ubiquitous within the healthcare system.
An afternoon of pre-conference master-classes focused on central venous access devices, wound care and pharmacology.
Prevalence of the use of central venous access devices within and outside of the intensive care unit: results of a survey among hospitals in the Prevention Epicenter Program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.