venous


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vein

 [vān]
a vessel through which blood passes from various organs or parts back to the heart, in the systemic circulation carrying blood that has given up most of its oxygen. Veins, like arteries, have three coats: an inner coat (tunica intima), middle coat (tunica media), and outer coat (tunica externa); however, in veins these are less thick and collapse when the vessel is cut. Many veins, especially superficial ones, have valves formed of reduplication of their lining membrane. See Appendix 2-6 and see also Plates.
afferent v's veins that carry blood to an organ.
allantoic v's paired vessels that accompany the allantois, growing out from the primitive hindgut and entering the body stalk of the early embryo.
cardinal v's embryonic vessels that include the pre- and postcardinal veins and the ducts of Cuvier (common cardinal veins).
emissary vein one passing through a foramen of the skull and draining blood from a cerebral sinus into a vessel outside the skull. See anatomic Table of Veins in the Appendices.
postcardinal v's paired vessels in the early embryo that return blood from regions caudal to the heart.
precardinal v's paired venous trunks in the embryo cranial to the heart.
pulp v's vessels draining the venous sinuses of the spleen.
subcardinal v's paired vessels in the embryo, replacing the postcardinal veins and persisting to some degree as definitive vessels.
sublobular v's tributaries of the hepatic veins that receive the central veins of hepatic lobules.
supracardinal v's paired vessels in the embryo developing later than the subcardinal veins and persisting chiefly as the lower segment of the inferior vena cava.
thebesian v's smallest cardiac veins; see anatomic Table of Veins in the Appendices.
trabecular v's vessels coursing in splenic trabeculae, formed by tributary pulp veins.
varicose v's see varicose veins.
vitelline v's veins that return the blood from the yolk sac to the primitive heart of the early embryo.

ve·nous

(vē'nŭs),
Relating to a vein or to the veins.
Synonym(s): phleboid (2)
[L. venosus]

venous

(vē′nəs)
adj.
1. Of or relating to the veins in the body: venous circulation.
2. Of, relating to, or being the blood in the veins or pulmonary arteries that is usually dark red as a result of low oxygen content.
3. Having numerous veins, as a leaf or the wings of an insect.

ve′nous·ly adv.
ve′nous·ness n.

ve·nous

(vē'nŭs)
Relating to a vein or to the veins.
[L. venosus]

venous

pertaining to a vein or veins.

ve·nous

(vē'nŭs)
Relating to a vein or veins.
[L. venosus]

Patient discussion about venous

Q. How can I prevent blood clots? I am 45 years old and am supposed to go on a business trip overseas. The flight itself is 12 hours long and then I have to continue traveling by bus. Could this cause me to have blood clots? If so, how can I prevent it?

A. Always walk as much as you can on the plane. Also, rotate your ankels in circles. Sometimes try to use your ankels and make the alphabet with them. Have fun..

More discussions about venous
References in periodicals archive ?
Key players in the market are focused on launching novel catheters in order to reduce thrombus accumulation and address the critical unmet needs of patients in venous access.
We randomly selected 90 adult patients older than 20 years who had a thoracic central venous catheter and another femoral venous catheter in placed, one of which was meant for fluid and nutrition and the other for different purposes like renal replacement therapy or temporary pacemaker.
In most cases, CVI is caused by the presence of the vertical venous reflux caused by the malfunction of either the sapheno-femoral or sapheno-popliteal venous valve.
The US FDA's premarket approval for the company's Venovo venous stent is reportedly the first stent indicated to treat iliofemoral venous occlusive disease, which is obstructed or narrowed blood flow specific to the iliac and femoral veins located near the groin.
Delayed portal venous imaging revealed active extravasation arising from peripheral right portal venous branches in both patients (Fig.
The researchers found that at six-month follow-up, rates for provoked, unprovoked, and cancer-related venous thromboembolism, respectively, were 6.8, 6.92, and 9.06 per 100 person-years.
The self-expanding, nitinol VICI stent system was developed specifically for use in the venous anatomy, which presents different challenges than placing stents in the arterial vascular system.
Conclusion: Two-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance venography examination was found to be a useful imaging tool showing great sensitivity in determining the normal cerebral venous anatomy.
At the level of the atlas, venous sinuses were observed, which later formed the two longitudinal veins of the IVVP.
Changes in microcirculation lead to an increase of venous pressure, which results in impaired blood outflow.
Venous insufficiency was detected by performing color Doppler ultrasound of lower limb veins.
THE USE OF TOPICAL timolol maleate as a treatment for chronic diabetic and chronic venous ulcers showed increased wound healing compared with controls, according to the results of a prospective observational study of 60 patients.