vellus


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Related to vellus: terminal hair

vellus

 [vel´us]
the coat of fine hairs that appears after the lanugo hairs are cast off and that persists until puberty.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

vel·lus

(vel'ŭs),
1. Fine nonpigmented hair covering most of the body.
2. A structure that is fleecy or soft and woolly in appearance.
[L. fleece]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

vellus

(vĕl′əs)
n.
The fine hair present on the body before puberty.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

vel·lus

(vel'ŭs)
1. Fine, nonpigmented hair covering most of the body.
2. Any structure that is fleecy, soft, and woolly.
[L. fleece]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Vellus hairs (VH) were found in 4 patients (16.6%) initially, 8 patients (33%) at 4 weeks and 16 patients (66.6%) at 8 weeks (Figure 2, 3, 5).
Don't worry, however, as hairs on any part of your body do not grow back thicker or darker (unless vellus hairs change to terminal hairs in puberty or there are endocrinologic imbalances).
Short vellus hair was observed in 26 male patients as compared to only one female patient.
I&D expression of the few remaining lesions resulted in oily, curd-like material containing multiple vellus hairs (Figure 1).
During puberty, vellus hairs in some sites start to
Steatocystoma multiplex can be associated with pachyonychia congenita type 2 (which is characterized by hypertrophic nail dystrophy, focal keratoderma, multiple pilosebaceous cysts, and myriad conditions associated with ectodermal dysplasia) or eruptive vellus hair cysts [1,5].
Oculorum sensu fallax; aqua tacita; vellus aquarum [...] rex David explicatus Qui dat nivem sicut lanam.
In patients with alopecia areata the most common trichoscopic feature (Figure 2) was black dots in 12 patients, 60.0%, followed by yellow dots seen in 11 patients, 55.0%, exclamation mark in 11 patients, 55.0%, white hairs in 9 patients, 45.0%, short vellus hairs in 8 patients, 40.0%, short broken hairs in 8 patients, 40.0%, and pig tail growing hairs in 3 patients, 15.0% (Table 2).
When vellus hairs are dispersed on the examined skin site, they are harvested by CSSS.
There are different types of human hair, vellus, and terminal hair.
These are Vellus Hairs, they have less pigment (colour) and the reason they grow so long is because they remain in the 'Anagen phase' - when hair grows 1cm every 28 days - longer than other hair.