veil

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veil

 [vāl]
a covering structure; see also velamen and velum.
1. caul.
2. slight huskiness of the voice.

ve·lum

, pl.

ve·la

(vē'lŭm, -lă),
1. Any structure resembling a veil or curtain. Synonym(s): veil (1) , velamen, velamentum
2. Synonym(s): caul (1)
3. Synonym(s): greater omentum
4. Any serous membrane or membranous envelope or covering.
[L. veil, sail]

veil

(vāl)
1. a covering structure.
2. a caul or piece of amniotic sac occasionally covering the face of a newborn child.

caul

, cowl (kawl, kowl)
1. The amnion, either as a piece of membrane capping the baby's head at birth or the whole membrane when delivered unruptured with the baby.
Synonym(s): galea (4) , veil (2) , velum (2) .
2. Synonym(s): greater omentum.
[Gaelic, call, a veil]

ve·lum

, pl. vela (vē'lŭm, -lă)
1. Any structure resembling a veil or curtain.
Synonym(s): veil (1) , velamen.
2. Synonym(s): caul (1) .
3. Synonym(s): greater omentum.
4. Any serous membrane or membranous envelope or covering.
[L. veil, sail]

caul

, cowl (kawl, kowl)
1. The amnion, either as a piece of membrane capping the baby's head at birth or the whole membrane when delivered unruptured with the baby.
Synonym(s): galea (4) , veil (2) , velum (2) .
2. Synonym(s): greater omentum.
[Gaelic, call, a veil]

ve·lum

, pl. vela (vē'lŭm, -lă)
1. Any structure resembling a veil or curtain.
Synonym(s): veil (1) , velamen.
2. Synonym(s): caul (1) .
3. Synonym(s): greater omentum.
4. Any serous membrane or membranous envelope or covering.
[L. veil, sail]

veil

1. a covering structure.
2. a caul or piece of amniotic sac occasionally covering the face of a newborn animal.

veil cell
fibroblast-like cells which surround small vessels in the dermis.
References in classic literature ?
He loved to kneel down on the cold marble pavement and watch the priest, in his stiff flowered dalmatic, slowly and with white hands moving aside the veil of the tabernacle, or raising aloft the jewelled, lantern-shaped monstrance with that pallid wafer that at times, one would fain think, is indeed the "panis caelestis," the bread of angels, or, robed in the garments of the Passion of Christ, breaking the Host into the chalice and smiting his breast for his sins.
To this the unhappy lady made no reply; and though Dorothea repeated her offers more earnestly she still kept silence, until the gentleman with the veil, who, the servant said, was obeyed by the rest, approached and said to Dorothea, "Do not give yourself the trouble, senora, of making any offers to that woman, for it is her way to give no thanks for anything that is done for her; and do not try to make her answer unless you want to hear some lie from her lips.
Yet perhaps the pale-faced congregation was almost as fearful a sight to the minister, as his black veil to them.
As we turned into the Corbury road the snow began to fall again, cutting off our last glimpse of the house; and Frome's silence fell with it, letting down between us the old veil of reticence.
Through their veil Archer caught the glint of the Lime Rock, with its white-washed turret and the tiny house in which the heroic light-house keeper, Ida Lewis, was living her last venerable years.
This supplementary program also instructed the excursionists to provide themselves with light musical instruments for amusement in the ship, with saddles for Syrian travel, green spectacles and umbrellas, veils for Egypt, and substantial clothing to use in rough pilgrimizing in the Holy Land.
Then came spear upon spear of light flashing far away across the boundless wilderness, piercing and firing the veils of mist, till the desert was draped in a tremulous golden glow, and it was day.
Everything is exposed to the public gaze, veils are thrown back, every wound is probed by careless fingers.
The heavens spread their fiery veils as if to stifle all noises, to envelop all existences; the rabbit under the broom, the fly under the leaf, slept as the wave did beneath the heavens.
There was a motor-car with an old lady swathed in blue veils, and a lady's maid on the seat opposite, holding a King Charles's spaniel; there was a country-woman wheeling a perambulator full of sticks down the middle of the road; there was a bailiff in gaiters discussing the state of the cattle market with a dissenting minister--so she defined them.
Winding veils round their heads, the women walked on deck.
He tore the veils of illusion from the business game, and saw its nakedness.