veil

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veil

 [vāl]
a covering structure; see also velamen and velum.
1. caul.
2. slight huskiness of the voice.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ve·lum

, pl.

ve·la

(vē'lŭm, -lă),
1. Any structure resembling a veil or curtain. Synonym(s): veil (1) , velamen, velamentum
2. Synonym(s): caul (1)
3. Synonym(s): greater omentum
4. Any serous membrane or membranous envelope or covering.
[L. veil, sail]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

caul

, cowl (kawl, kowl)
1. The amnion, either as a piece of membrane capping the baby's head at birth or the whole membrane when delivered unruptured with the baby.
Synonym(s): galea (4) , veil (2) , velum (2) .
2. Synonym(s): greater omentum.
[Gaelic, call, a veil]

ve·lum

, pl. vela (vē'lŭm, -lă)
1. Any structure resembling a veil or curtain.
Synonym(s): veil (1) , velamen.
2. Synonym(s): caul (1) .
3. Synonym(s): greater omentum.
4. Any serous membrane or membranous envelope or covering.
[L. veil, sail]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

caul

, cowl (kawl, kowl)
1. The amnion, either as a piece of membrane capping the baby's head at birth or the whole membrane when delivered unruptured with the baby.
Synonym(s): galea (4) , veil (2) , velum (2) .
2. Synonym(s): greater omentum.
[Gaelic, call, a veil]

ve·lum

, pl. vela (vē'lŭm, -lă)
1. Any structure resembling a veil or curtain.
Synonym(s): veil (1) , velamen.
2. Synonym(s): caul (1) .
3. Synonym(s): greater omentum.
4. Any serous membrane or membranous envelope or covering.
[L. veil, sail]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Now in its third printing, the book has become the definitive source on the topic of veiling, much to the chagrin of Muslim-bashers who try to discredit El Guindi's theory that women are not denigrated by the veil so much as empowered by employing it as a political weapon.
The carefully researched chapter by Fair can serve as an example here, as it employs a historical approach to discuss a century of changes in veiling in Zanzibar.
There is a unanimously held view in the literature on womanhood in Islam that the phenomenon of veiling is associated with the oppression of women.
The panel declared that face-covering veiling was "a sign of subservience [and] debasement" (Davies 2010).
What Is Veiling? is an important work that stands to advance multicultural conversations and is a must-read for all those who wish to intelligently approach the subject of Muslim women and autonomy.
Chapter three discusses the argument that veiling is the assertion of cultural identity, of the right and of the pride to be different within the globalized cultures of the "West." "In the post-9/11 era, experimenting with the hijab (because for many it is an experiment) has emerged as an increasingly attractive method for women from Muslim communities in Europe and North America to display pride in their culture." (p.54) Although she recognizes that there are several obvious reasons for this and that it may be a response to the excesses of fear and prejudice against Islam, the author doubts that the reduction of Muslim culture to a garment is the only way to force respect from Western nations (p.63) and the best response to anti-Muslim prejudice.
Scott parses the French gendered historical and political narratives at play in the headscarf debate in France; Winter also discusses France, but she focuses on critiquing feminist support of veiling, as well as Islamist advocacy of it.
The authors who address Muslim veiling show the diversity in veiling practices across the globe.
Kessler's next chapter investigates the veiling apparent in Manet's portrayals of Berthe Morisot.
Islam does not oblige women to be veiled; rather, veiling was introduced into Yemeni society as a fashion by the Ottoman Empire, with high-class women wearing it.
I have heard Muslim women questioned on whether they are forced to veil by their husbands or fathers; if they agree that to cover the face conceals emotions, putting others at a disadvantage; and, since the Koran does not require veiling, do they feel that to do so is to fulfil a religious obligation?
Dr Meena Dhanda will give her talk, Reflections on Veiling, to students and staff at Wolverhampton University's Millennium City Building today.