veil


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

veil

 [vāl]
a covering structure; see also velamen and velum.
1. caul.
2. slight huskiness of the voice.

ve·lum

, pl.

ve·la

(vē'lŭm, -lă),
1. Any structure resembling a veil or curtain. Synonym(s): veil (1) , velamen, velamentum
2. Synonym(s): caul (1)
3. Synonym(s): greater omentum
4. Any serous membrane or membranous envelope or covering.
[L. veil, sail]

veil

(vāl)
1. a covering structure.
2. a caul or piece of amniotic sac occasionally covering the face of a newborn child.

caul

, cowl (kawl, kowl)
1. The amnion, either as a piece of membrane capping the baby's head at birth or the whole membrane when delivered unruptured with the baby.
Synonym(s): galea (4) , veil (2) , velum (2) .
2. Synonym(s): greater omentum.
[Gaelic, call, a veil]

ve·lum

, pl. vela (vē'lŭm, -lă)
1. Any structure resembling a veil or curtain.
Synonym(s): veil (1) , velamen.
2. Synonym(s): caul (1) .
3. Synonym(s): greater omentum.
4. Any serous membrane or membranous envelope or covering.
[L. veil, sail]

caul

, cowl (kawl, kowl)
1. The amnion, either as a piece of membrane capping the baby's head at birth or the whole membrane when delivered unruptured with the baby.
Synonym(s): galea (4) , veil (2) , velum (2) .
2. Synonym(s): greater omentum.
[Gaelic, call, a veil]

ve·lum

, pl. vela (vē'lŭm, -lă)
1. Any structure resembling a veil or curtain.
Synonym(s): veil (1) , velamen.
2. Synonym(s): caul (1) .
3. Synonym(s): greater omentum.
4. Any serous membrane or membranous envelope or covering.
[L. veil, sail]

veil

1. a covering structure.
2. a caul or piece of amniotic sac occasionally covering the face of a newborn animal.

veil cell
fibroblast-like cells which surround small vessels in the dermis.
References in classic literature ?
Though this sudden and startling movement of the Indian produced no sound from the other, in the surprise her veil also was allowed to open its folds, and betrayed an indescribable look of pity, admiration, and horror, as her dark eye followed the easy motions of the savage.
Now old Merlin stepped into view and cast a dainty web of gossamer threads over Sir Sagramor which turned him into Hamlet's ghost; the king made a sign, the bugles blew, Sir Sagramor laid his great lance in rest, and the next moment here he came thundering down the course with his veil flying out behind, and I went whistling through the air like an arrow to meet him -- cocking my ear the while, as if noting the invisible knight's position and progress by hearing, not sight.
Wilson had quickly chosen a position from which he could watch the girl without running much risk of being seen by her, and he remained there hoping she would raise her veil and betray her face.
Just at sunset, the air turned cold and the sky cloudy: I went in, Sophie called me upstairs to look at my wedding-dress, which they had just brought; and under it in the box I found your present--the veil which, in your princely extravagance, you sent for from London: resolved, I suppose, since I would not have jewels, to cheat me into accepting something as costly.
Not having a veil to put down over my own face, I stooped and picked up the newspaper.
As another instance of these bitter fruits of conquest, and perhaps the strongest that can be quoted, we may mention, that the Princess Matilda, though a daughter of the King of Scotland, and afterwards both Queen of England, niece to Edgar Atheling, and mother to the Empress of Germany, the daughter, the wife, and the mother of monarchs, was obliged, during her early residence for education in England, to assume the veil of a nun, as the only means of escaping the licentious pursuit of the Norman nobles.
The gentleman grasped her firmly by the shoulders, and being so fully occupied with holding her back, he was unable to put a hand to his veil which was falling off, as it did at length entirely, and Dorothea, who was holding the lady in her arms, raising her eyes saw that he who likewise held her was her husband, Don Fernando.
The painful catastrophe he had just witnessed appeared effectually to have rent away the veil which the intoxication of the evening before had raised between himself and his memory.
It shook with his measured breath, as he gave out the psalm; it threw its obscurity between him and the holy page, as he read the Scriptures; and while he prayed, the veil lay heavily on his uplifted countenance.
The veil, which shrouded her whole face, was too thick for me to see more than the glitter of bright eyes and the hazy outline of what might be a lovely oval face, but might also, unfortunately, be an equally unlovely one.
Yes, I have been reading it ever since I woke; and I am got to the black veil.
These are picturesque and fanciful, but not so varied as at Constantinople and Smyrna; the women of Beirout add an agony--in the two former cities the sex wear a thin veil which one can see through (and they often expose their ancles,) but at Beirout they cover their entire faces with dark-colored or black veils, so that they look like mummies, and then expose their breasts to the public.