vegetative function

vegetative function

Any of the nonconscious body processes needed to keep the body alive.
References in periodicals archive ?
The main role of the primary organ and the fluid that it moves is thus a vegetative function.
57) The brain, it is argued, controls the functioning of the entire body, including the vegetative functions necessary for disposing the body for continuing to be informed by the soul.
In the animal world on the other hand the process of evolution is characterised by the progressive discrimination of the animal and vegetative functions and a consequent differentiation of these two great provinces into their separate departments.
Whereas Aristotle regarded the nutritive or vegetative functions of plants as the first level of ensouled or "animate" existence, Winfield treats the organic processes of unification, metabolism, and reproduction as necessary, but still not sufficient, preconditions of mentality.
Because plants assigned to "prevention of pollination" treatment did not produce seeds, we cannot examine the effect of pollination treatments on biomass allocation between sexual reproduction and vegetative functions.
Parkinsonism' or 'excessive sweating is embrassing' which are then expanded by a nice mixture of clincal observations and literature review covering diagnosis, therapy (both pharmacological and non-pharmacological), mood disorders, sleep disorders, cognitive impairment, and automatic and vegetative functions (including sweating, sexual dysfunction and urinary incontinence).
It is presented in the form of statements (or maxims), such as all that shakes is not necessarily Parkinsonism' or 'excessive sweating is embarrassing' which are then expanded by a nice mixture or clinical observations and literature review covering diagnosis, therapy (both pharmacological and non-pharmacological), mood disorders, sleep disorders, cognitive impairment and autonomic and vegetative functions (incluing sweating, sexual dysfunction and urinary incontinence).
1] The brain stem, the lower center of the brain, basically controls vegetative functions, such as respiration, and primitive stereotyped reflexes, such as the pupillary response to light.
Heart beat, as well as other vegetative functions related to internal homeostasis, can continue, since these functions are semi-autonomous, i.
The application of this tenet in clinical end-of-life cases is challenged, however, by the ability to maintain, through the use of a mechanical ventilator or a cardiopulmonary bypass machine, the vegetative functions of a body which has suffered whole-brain infarction and thus satisfies the widely accepted criterion for determining when death occurs.