thrush

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thrush

 [thrush]
infection of the oral mucous membrane by the fungus Candida albicans; called also oral candidiasis. It is characterized by white patches on a red, moist inflamed surface, occurring anywhere in the mouth, including the tongue, but usually on the inner cheeks, occasionally accompanied by pain and fever. Approximately 20 to 30 per cent of people harbor C. albicans, but the disease develops in only a small number. Those most susceptible are infants and adults who are in a weakened condition from infection, malnutrition, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, prolonged treatment with antibiotics, or immunodeficiency. Thrush is sometimes regarded as a minor infection, yet it can persist for weeks or even months, especially in young babies and immunocompromised patients. It is treated with antifungal agents. The best preventive measures are good general health, a well-balanced diet, adequate rest, and good mouth hygiene. The Infectious Disease Society of America has published “Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Candidiasis” on their web site, http://www.idsociety.org.

thrush

(thrŭsh),
1. Infection of the oral tissues with Candida albicans; often an opportunistic infection in humans with AIDS or those suffering from other conditions that depress the immune system; also common in normal infants who have been treated with antibiotics.
2. In veterinary medicine, refers to moist putrifying condition of the equine hoff affecting the area called the frog; producing necrotic foul-smelling black discharge; may extend into the medial and lateral sulci, eroding them, and may involve the bars and sole area. Left untreated, the frog may be undermined and permanent structural damage may ensue.
[fr. the thrush fungus, Candida albicans]

thrush

(thrŭsh)
n.
1. A contagious disease caused by a fungus, Candida albicans, that occurs most often in infants and children, characterized by small whitish eruptions on the mouth, throat, and tongue, and usually accompanied by fever, colic, and diarrhea.
2. An infection of the frog of a horse's foot, characterized by a foul-smelling discharge and often resulting from unhygienic stall conditions.
A popular term for oral and mucocutaneous candidiasis, first used by Samuel Pepys in 1665, which is characterised by erythematous intraoral lesion overlaid by white, creamy patches that correspond to necrotic debris, squames, fibrin, inflammatory cells, fungal hyphae and bacteria
At risk groups Infants, immunocompromised patients, malnourished patients in poor health, or post-antibiotic therapy

thrush

Pseudomembranous candidiasis A popular term for oral and mucocutaneous candidiasis, characterized by erythematous intraoral lesion overlaid by white, creamy patches, which correspond to necrotic debris, squames, fibrin, inflammatory cells, fungal hyphae and bacteria At risk groups Infants, immunocompromised Pts, malnourished Pts in poor health, or post-antibiotic therapy

thrush

(thrŭsh)
Infection of the oral tissues with Candida albicans; often an opportunistic infection in patients with AIDS or other disorders that depress the action of immune system.
[fr. the thrush fungus, Candida albicans]

thrush

Infection with the common fungus of the genus Candida , especially by the species Candida albicans . Thrush mainly affects the warm, moist areas of the body such as the mouth or the vagina but any part of the skin may be affected. There is persistent itching or soreness and characteristic white patches, like soft cheese, with raw-looking inflamed areas in between. Thrush also causes vaginal discharge. The condition is treated with antifungal drugs, such as CLOTRIMAZOLE, MICONAZOLE or NYSTATIN, in ointments, creams or PESSARIES.

thrush

  1. an acute or chronic condition produced by the fungus Candida albicans in which lesions occur in the mucous membranes of mouth, vagina and respiratory tissues. Thrush can occur also in skin areas that are subjected to long periods of immersion in water.
  2. a member of the PASSERINE genus Turdus.

Thrush

A disease of the mouth, caused by Candida albicans and characterized by a whitish growth and ulcers. It can be diagnosed with the KOH test.

thrush

(thrŭsh)
Infection of the oral tissues with Candida albicans; often an opportunistic infection in patients with AIDS or other disorders that depress the immune system.
[fr. the thrush fungus, Candida albicans]
References in periodicals archive ?
For the remaining two deaths, the transmitter was recovered in association with Veery feathers and body parts, but the identity of the predator was unknown.
The winter range of the veery (Catharus fuscescens): Lessons for determining winter ranges of species that winter in the tropics.
The Veery derivatives due to their superior agronomic feature and disease resistance were widely cultivated in different parts of the world (Table 4).
"VEERY"--a CIMMYT spring wheat with the 1B/ 1R chromosome translocation.
Young, moist woodlands with dense understory and early successional forests are preferred habitats for American Woodcock and Veery. Brushy, successional forests and overgrown fields are preferred habitats for Chestnut-sided Warbler and Field Sparrow.
The second axis segregates mature deciduous forest species (such as Veery, Least Flycatcher, Ovenbird, Rose-breasted Grosbeak) at the upper end of the diagram, and coniferous forest birds such as Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, and Red-breasted Nuthatch at the lower end (Fig.
The chorus of peepers down at the small pond, the plaintive veery in the ash tree, this sagging porch where she'd sat over many extinct summers.
And if you only hear one winter wren or veery in descending ripple through the dusk, it's worth sore feet.
The birds sang quite as in our woods,--the red-eye, red-start, veery, wood-pewee, etc., but we saw no bluebirds in all our journey, and several told me in Bangor that they had not the bluebird there.
The second evening, I sat outdoors listening to a veery's ethereal, liquid, downward-spiraling call and watching the snipe's mating flight back and forth and around the sky.
To evaluate potential differences in fitness relative to phenological period, we estimated mass change in 13 species of landbird migrants [Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus), Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula), Hermit Thrush (Catharus guttatus), Veery (Catharus fuscescens), Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina), Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis), Blue-winged Warbler (Vermivora pinus), Nashville Warbler (Vermivara mficapilla), Magnolia Warbler (Setophaga magnolia), Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga pensylvanica), Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapillus), Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas), and White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) ].
Host species tested for Anaplasma phagocytophiluum reservoir competence, southeastern New York, USA, 2008-2010 * Host species Common name Mammals Blarina brevicauda Northern short-tailed shrew Didelphis virginiana Virginia opossum Glaucomys volans Southern flying squirrel Mephitis mephitis Striped skunk Peromyscus leucopus White-footed mouse Procyon lotor Raccoon Sciurus carolinensis Eastern gray squirrel Sorex cinereus Masked shrew Tamias striatus Eastern chipmunk Tamiasciurus hudsonicus Eastern red squirrel Birds Catharus fuscescens Veery Dumetella carolinensis Gray catbird Hylocichla mustelina Wood thrush Turdus migratorius American robin No.