vection


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vection

 [vek´shun]
the carrying of disease germs from an infected person to a well person.

vec·tion

(vek'shŭn),
Transference of the agents of disease from an infected to an uninfected individual by a vector.
[L. vectio, conveyance]

vec·tion

(vek'shŭn)
Transference of the agents of disease from an infected to an uninfected individual by a vector.
[L. vectio, conveyance]
References in periodicals archive ?
The role of vection eye movements and postural instability in the etiology of motion sickness, Journal of Vestibular Research-Equilibrium and Orientation 14 (4), pp.335-346.
When we view a large visual motion field that simulates the retinal flow in a real situation, we often perceive self-motion, even though we do not actually move (vection: Fischer & Kornmuller, 1930).
Effects of ginger on motion sickness and gastric slow-wave dysrhythmias induced by circular vection. Am.
Although vection, heading, and postural control are all based on vision, postural control has a more obvious direct connection with the equilibrium sense and proprioception.
Vection illusion is the sensation of self-motion induced by relative movement of viewed objects.
Called the Vection Novice Driver Trainer (NDT), this makes use of a Quantum3D visual computing system and features a 50 [degrees] field of view, mirror insets, force feedback controls and full instrumentation.
Visual field movement tends to be more effective in inducing illusory self-motion (vection) and also motion sickness when presented to peripheral vision (Kano, 1991; Yar dley, 1992), as may often be the case in moving vehicles.
The simulator environments were created and coordinated with DriveSafety's HyperDrive Authoring Suite[TM] and Vection Simulation Software[TM] Version 1.4.2.
One vendor taking education to the consumer is Salton, which has a different marketing approach for its Ultra Vection oven, plugging it with infomercials to capture greater interest.
Visually induced perceived self-motion, which is sometimes labeled vection (Howard, 1986a), may evoke postural disturbances, as can be observed in large-screen theaters such as IMAX.
This is probably attributable to the relationship between vection (i.e., illusory self-motion) and the spatial and temporal frequency of optical patterns (i.e., scene complexity; Hettinger, 2002).
Optical simulations of self-motion often give rise to the subjective experience of self-motion relative to the inertial environment, which is referred to as vection. Vection is common in vehicular simulators, wide field-of-view cinemas (e.g., IMAX), and head-mounted visual display systems.