vection


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vection

 [vek´shun]
the carrying of disease germs from an infected person to a well person.

vec·tion

(vek'shŭn),
Transference of the agents of disease from an infected to an uninfected individual by a vector.
[L. vectio, conveyance]

vection

/vec·tion/ (vek´shun) the carrying of disease germs from an infected person to a well person.

vec·tion

(vek'shŭn)
Transference of the agents of disease from an infected to an uninfected individual by a vector.
[L. vectio, conveyance]

vection

the carrying of disease germs from an infected animal to a well animal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although in the case of visual vection the self-motion perception is induced mainly by visual stimulation, the perceptual system of self-motion uses sensory motion signals from modalities other than vision; hence, visual vection is susceptible to such signals (Seno, Ito, & Sunaga, 2011).
Effects of ginger on motion sickness and gastric slow-wave dysrhythmias induced by circular vection.
Although vection, heading, and postural control are all based on vision, postural control has a more obvious direct connection with the equilibrium sense and proprioception.
A common vection illusion encountered during night flying occurs when a well-lighted aircraft penetrates a cloud, haze, or precipitation.
One vendor taking education to the consumer is Salton, which has a different marketing approach for its Ultra Vection oven, plugging it with infomercials to capture greater interest.
Visually induced perceived self-motion, which is sometimes labeled vection (Howard, 1986a), may evoke postural disturbances, as can be observed in large-screen theaters such as IMAX.
Vection is common in vehicular simulators, wide field-of-view cinemas (e.
In Figure 1 this is represented by vection, which refers to feelings of self-motion from optical flow (Leibowitz, Rodemer, & Dichgans, 1979).
The driving simulator was a 1992 Mercury Sable configured with the Hyperion Technologies Vection Research Simulator (VRS).
Both the nausea and vection ratings increased significantly with speeds increasing from 3 m/s to 10 m/s.
Indeed, it is generally acknowledged that the estimation of subjective speed is underestimated when based on visual cues only, as shown by early experiments on linear vection (Pavard & Berthoz, 1977), on velocity change estimation (Monen & Brenner, 1994), and using a fixed-based driving simulator (Snowden, Stimpson, & Ruddle, 1998).