vasovagal syncope


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syncope

 [sing´kah-pe]
faint. adj. adj syn´copal, syncop´ic.
cardiac syncope sudden loss of consciousness, either with momentary premonitory symptoms or without warning, due to cerebral anemia caused by ventricular asystole, extreme bradycardia, or ventricular fibrillation.
laryngeal syncope tussive syncope.
neurocardiogenic syncope a particularly serious type of vasovagal attack; the etiology is unknown.
stretching syncope syncope associated with stretching the arms upward with the spine extended.
swallow syncope syncope associated with swallowing, a disorder of atrioventricular conduction mediated by the vagus nerve.
tussive syncope brief loss of consciousness associated with paroxysms of coughing.
vasovagal syncope vasovagal attack.

va·so·de·pres·sor syn·co·pe

faintness or loss of consciousness due to reflex reduction in blood pressure.
Synonym(s): vasovagal syncope

vasovagal syncope

a sudden loss of consciousness resulting from cerebral ischemia, secondary to decreased cardiac output, peripheral vasodilation, and bradycardia and associated with vagal activity. The condition may be triggered by pain, fright, or trauma and is accompanied by symptoms of nausea, pallor, and perspiration. Also called vasodepressor syncope.

neurocardiogenic syncope

A syncope with a psychogenic substrate and predisposition to bradycardia, hypotension and peripheral vasodilation.
 
Clinical findings
Abrupt loss of vascular tone; nausea; diaphoresis; pallor.
 
Diagnosis
Tilt test, in which the patient is placed on a tilt table at a 40º to 80º angle from horizontal and maintained in a motionless upright position for 10–15 minutes or more.
 
Management
Beta blockers—e.g., metoprolol, theophylline, disopyramide.

Mechanism
Uncertain; probably activation of myocardial mechanoreceptors (C fibres), with decreased efferent sympathetic tone and increased efferent parasympathetic tone.

vasovagal syncope

Neurocardiogenic syncope, see there.

va·so·va·gal syn·co·pe

(vā'sō-vā'găl sing'kŏ-pē)
Faintness or loss of consciousness due to increased vagus nerve (parasympathetic) activity.
Synonym(s): vasodepressor syncope.

vasovagal syncope

See FAINTING.

syncope

a temporary suspension of consciousness due to cerebral anemia; fainting.

cardiac syncope
sudden loss of consciousness due to cerebral anemia caused by ventricular asystole, extreme bradycardia or ventricular fibrillation.
drug-induced syncope
may result from abnormalities of cardiac rhythm, caused by treatment with digitalis, and hypotension caused by drugs such as diuretics, promazine and phenothiazine tranquilizers, and peripheral vasodilating agents.
laryngeal syncope
tussive syncope.
Stokes-Adams syncope
swallow syncope
syncope associated with swallowing, a disorder of atrioventricular conduction mediated by the vagus nerve.
tussive syncope
brief loss of consciousness associated with paroxysms of coughing.
vasovagal syncope
see vasovagal attack.
References in periodicals archive ?
It states that emotional stress, anxiety, pain, fatigue and being in a hot and crowded environment can lead to vasovagal syncope.
Just in case the signs of vasovagal syncope appear, the dental procedure will be immediately stopped and treatment provided as soon as possible.
For more information about vasovagal syncope, call Stars on (01789) 450 564 or visit www.
The POST patient population was severely affected, with a median 11-year history of vasovagal syncope, including nine prior episodes and three in the year before enrollment.
Of patients who completed the study, 48% experienced vasovagal syncope during 1 year of follow-up.
Pacing is an effective therapy for vasovagal syncope and physicians should consider it as an option for symptomatic fainters.
I think that clearly this is one of the waves of the future in how we're going to treat at least this group of patients with vasovagal syncope and warning signs," he said at the meeting, which was sponsored by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.
Vasovagal syncope in medical students and their first degree relatives.
Participants had previously failed to respond to multiple drugs widely used for vasovagal syncope.
acknowledged that the treatment of vasovagal syncope isn't exactly a hotbed of evidence-based medicine.
The classical vasovagal syncope (VVS) is generally not associated with other diseases and is benign and common (2).
We aimed to examine the association between the molecular background and vasovagal syncope.