vasopressor


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Related to vasopressor: vasopressin

vasopressor

 [vas″o-pres´or]
1. stimulating contraction of the muscular tissue of the capillaries and arteries.
2. an agent that has this effect.

va·so·pres·sor

(vā'sō-pres'ŏr, vas-ō-),
1. Producing vasoconstriction and a rise in blood pressure, usually understood to be systemic arterial pressure unless otherwise specified.
2. An agent that has this effect.

vasopressor

(vā′zō-prĕs′ər)
adj.
Of, relating to, or causing constriction of blood vessels.
n.
An agent that causes a rise in blood pressure.

va·so·pres·sor

(vā'sō-pres'ŏr)
1. Producing vasoconstriction and a rise in systemic arterial pressure.
2. An agent that has this effect.

va·so·pres·sor

(vā'sō-pres'ŏr)
Agent producing vasoconstriction and a rise in blood pressure, usually understood to be systemic arterial pressure unless otherwise specified.
References in periodicals archive ?
[14,17,18,24,25,29-32] HIET has been shown to restore haemodynamic stability where high doses of multiple vasopressors have failed.
In this retrospective impact study, we observed that women who received colloid preloading required less vasopressor post-spinal anaesthesia than those who received crystalloid co-loading.
The sample was restricted to patients receiving vasopressor, to serve as their own controls (data during times vasopressor was not infusing) and cases (data during times when vasopressor was infusing).
The extended perioperative use of epidural analgesia during major abdominal surgery was also a contributing factor leading to hypotension, which of course, at that time, had to be compensated with more fluids to prevent the use of vasopressors. (2) The concepts of volume therapy were based on the relationship of preload and cardiac output described by the Frank Starling law, and the use of clinical parameters like blood pressure, heart rate and urine output.
This was not found in our small sample, where only two of the 21 patients who received vasopressor treatment (9.5%) had atrial fibrillation against four of 29 who did not receive vasopressor treatment (13.8%).
According to the GCS levels, there were no interperiod differences in aspiration pneumonia, intubation, vasopressor use, or mortality.
These included age, comorbid conditions like diabetes and hypertension, admission creatinine, peak creatinine, pH, [O.sub.2], C[O.sub.2], HC[O.sub.3], albumin, presence of oliguria, need for vasopressor, stay in ICU, and severity of AKI.
Vasopressor use appeared to have no impact on HRV, and p is nonsignificant for both time and frequency domains (Table 2).
Based on previous studies[8],[10],[12] and our experience, the following risk factors were collected: donor characteristics (age, sex, cause of death [COD], history of hypertension of diabetes, before donation estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR], hypotension process, vasopressor used, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation [CPR] event), cold and warm ischemia time, and recipient characteristics at the time of transplantation (age, sex, number of previous kidney transplantations, preexisting kidney disease, and number of human lymphocytic antigen mismatches).
Conventional treatment consists mainly of intravenous antibiotics, supportive care, and vasopressor agents to treat hypotension.
Inotropic and vasopressor (noradrenaline and adrenaline) infusions were needed to support the patient.