vasogenic shock


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va·so·gen·ic shock

shock resulting from depressed activity of the higher vasomotor centers in the brainstem and the medulla, producing vasodilation without loss of fluid so that the container is disproportionately large. In oligemic shock, blood volume is reduced; in both, return of venous blood is inadequate.

vasogenic shock

[-jen′ik]
Etymology: L, vas + genein, to produce; Fr, choc
shock resulting from peripheral vascular dilation produced by factors such as toxins that directly affect the blood vessels. Examples of vasogenic shock include anaphylactic shock and septic shock.

va·so·gen·ic shock

(vā'sō-jen'ik shok)
Shock due to depressed activity of the higher vasomotor centers in the brainstem and the medulla, producing vasodilation without loss of fluid so that the container is disproportionately large.

vasogenic shock

A dangerous condition in which the small arteries of the body widen so much that the volume of the blood is insufficient to maintain the circulation. Urgent measures to constrict the vessels or to increase the blood volume by fluid infusion are necessary.

va·so·gen·ic shock

(vāsō-jenik shok)
Shock resulting from depressed activity of higher vasomotor centers in brainstem and medulla, producing vasodilation without loss of fluid so that container is disproportionately large. In oligemic shock, blood volume is reduced; in both, return of venous blood is inadequate.