vasodilator


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vasodilator

 [vas″o-di-la´tor]
1. causing dilation of blood vessels.
2. a nerve or agent that has this effect.

va·so·di·la·tor

(vā'sō-dī-lā'tŏr, vas'ō-),
1. An agent that causes dilation of the blood vessels. Synonym(s): vasodilative (2)
2. A nerve, stimulation of which results in dilation of the blood vessels.

vasodilator

/vaso·di·la·tor/ (-di-la´ter)
1. causing dilatation of blood vessels.
2. a nerve or agent that does this.

vasodilator

(vā′zō-dī-lā′tər, -dĭ-, -dī′lā-)
n.
Something, such as a nerve or drug, that causes vasodilation.

vasodilator

[vā′zōdī′lātər]
Etymology: L, vas + dilatare
a nerve or agent that causes dilation of blood vessels by promoting the relaxation of vascular smooth muscle. Chemical vasodilators include hydralazine, nitroglycerin, nitroprusside, nesiritide, and trimethaphan. They have been useful in the treatment of acute heart failure in myocardial infarction, in cases associated with severe mitral regurgitation, and in failure resulting from myocardial disease.

vasodilator

An agent that dilates blood vessels Cardiology A vasoactive agent used in CHF–eg, nitrates, nitroprusside, hydralazine, ACE inhibitors, prazocin, captopril, to ↓ preload and/or afterload

va·so·di·la·tor

(vā'sō-dī'lā-tŏr)
1. An agent that causes dilation of the blood vessels.
Synonym(s): vasodilative (2) .
2. A nerve that stimulates dilation of the blood vessels.

Vasodilator

An agent, such as a nerve or hormone, that widens the blood vessels, which in turn decreases resistance to blood flow and lowers blood pressure.

vasodilator

agent causing dilatation of blood vessels

vasodilator (vāˈ·zō·dīˑ·lā·ter),

n a substance that widens blood vessels by relaxing the smooth muscle in the walls; decreases blood pressure.

va·so·di·la·tor

(vā'sō-dī'lā-tŏr)
1. An agent that causes dilation of blood vessels.
Synonym(s): vasodilative (2) .
2. A nerve, stimulation of which results in dilation of the blood vessels.

vasodilator (vā´zōdī´lātur),

n 1. an agent that causes dilation of the blood vessels.
n 2. a drug that relaxes the smooth muscle walls of the blood vessels and increases their diameter.

vasodilator

1. causing dilatation of blood vessels.
2. a nerve or agent that causes dilatation of blood vessels.

vasodilator agents
include prostaglandin E2, prostacyclin, bradykinin, histamine, serotonin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, substance P, adenosine triphosphate, endothelium-derived relaxing factor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among people who were not taking vasodilators, an estimated 8.
compared the vasodilator efficacies of nifedipine and papaverine in vascular structures constricted with norepinephrine and potassium.
All data are presented as means [+ or -] SEM vasodilator responses were measured as percentage reduction on the U46619-precontracted tone and CaCl2-induced vasoconstrictions were measured as tension changes in grams.
We have selected this topic with the aim to evaluate and compare the effects of diuretic, vasodilator therapies in Meniere's disease and also to compare these results with those mentioned in the literature so that a better regime of treatment can be formulated for the patients with Meniere's disease.
This study was designed to compare the early and late effects of papaverine and sodium nitroprusside solution as topical vasodilators for internal mammary artery.
Routine vasodilator testing before treatment initiation could eliminate this inappropriate use of calcium channel blockers, Dr.
This form of gaseous signaling molecule is very rare in nature however; the essential clinical utility of NO remains its potency as a vasodilator.
ATLANTA -- Soy phytoestrogens may have an adverse effect upon coronary vasodilator function in women with suspected myocardial ischemia.
Several methods are available to treat erectile dysfunction caused by neuropathy, including taking oral drugs, using a mechanical vacuum device, or injecting a drug called a vasodilator into the penis before sex.
These results, plus the findings of other audiologic and otoneurologic examinations, revealed that the patients in the HOT group experienced a significantly greater response to treatment than did those in the vasodilator group, regardless of age and sex variables.
Likewise, mixing a vasoconstrictor with a vasodilator can have bad consequences.
And a third is a vasodilator, which causes human blood vessels to open.