vasitis

deferentitis

 [def″er-en-ti´tis]
inflammation of the ductus deferens.

def·er·en·ti·tis

(def'ĕr-en-tī'tis),
Inflammation of the ductus deferens.
Synonym(s): vasitis

vasitis

Inflammation of the ductus (vas) deferens.

def·er·en·ti·tis

(def'ĕr-en-tī'tis)
Inflammation of the ductus deferens.
Synonym(s): vasitis.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Vasitis: clinical and ultrasound confusion with inguinal hernia clarified by computed tomography.
(6) Infectious vasitis, while rarely reported in the literature, is thought to be caused by common urinary tract pathogen.
A commonly encountered clinical entity, and the rarely described efferent ductule inflammation namely, vasitis. Vasitis is rarely reported as an isolated condition.
The case has been reported for its rarity and atypical presentation where the suppurative tuberculous vasitis presenting as a groin mass.
Unusual inguinal mass secondary to vasitis. J Urology 8:5 1976; 488-9.
Imaging findings prevent unnecessary surgery in vasitis: an under-reported condition mimicking inguinal hernia.
The CT scan was negative for an inguinal hernia and instead revealed an inflamed spermatic cord consistent with vasitis. The patient was referred back to urology, given antibiotics, and the condition resolved.
The CT scan was negative for inguinal hernia and instead revealed a thickened, edematous spermatic cord consistent with vasitis. The patient was referred to urology and given antibiotics once again with eventual resolution of symptoms.
We are only aware of 4 cases of infectious vasitis described in English language medical journals since 1933 and none in the past 20 years when modern medical imaging has been readily available.[sup.2]-[sup.5] Epididymitis, orchitis, testicular torsion and inguinal hernia are the most likely causes of groin pain and inflammation in males and it is not surprising that all previous reported cases of infectious vasitis underwent surgical intervention.
Hernias present as masses in the groin, and can become painful when incarcerated or trapped.[sup.9] The clinical and ultrasound findings of incarcerated inguinal hernias and vasitis can be very difficult to distinguish: both present clinically with groin masses and pain.
(3) When a thermal ("red hot wire") cautery is used, (4) a solid plug of scar tissue results with a minimum of spermatic granuloma formation and of vasitis nodosa.
Vasitis nodosa, in which a Medusa's head of channels reaches our from the testicular end of the vas, could explain this "technical failure" if one such channel reached the urethral end.