vascular

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vascular

 [vas´ku-ler]
pertaining to blood vessels or indicative of a copious blood supply.

vas·cu·lar

(vas'kyū-lăr),
Relating to or containing blood vessels.
[L. vasculum, a small vessel, dim. of vas]

vascular

/vas·cu·lar/ (vas´ku-ler)
1. pertaining to vessels, particularly blood vessels.
2. indicative of a copious blood supply.

vascular

(văs′kyə-lər)
adj.
Of, characterized by, or containing cells or vessels that carry or circulate fluids, such as blood, lymph, or sap, through the body of an animal or plant: vascular tissue; vascular disease.

vas′cu·lar′i·ty (-lăr′ĭ-tē) n.

vascular

[vas′kyələr]
Etymology: L, vasculum, little vessel
pertaining to a blood vessel.

vas·cu·lar

(vas'kyū-lăr)
Relating to or containing blood vessels.
[L. vasculum, a small vessel, dim. of vas]

vascular

(of vessels) conducting fluid, for example blood in mammals, water in plants.

Vascular

Having to do with blood vessels.

vascular

pertaining to blood vessels or indicative of a copious blood supply.

vascular clamps
see hemostatic forceps.
vascular clip
see clip (1).
vascular disease
vascular grafts
see vascular conduit.
vascular hemophilia
von Willebrand's disease.
vascular malformation
includes hamartoma, arteriovenous fistula, telangiectasia.
vascular neoplasm
listed elsewhere; these include hemangioma, hemangioendothelioma, hamartoma, telangiectasia, angiokeratoma, juvenile bovine angiomatosis, bovine cutaneous angiomatosis, varicose scrotal tumor, meningioangioma, lymphomatoid granulomatosis, lymphangioma, glomangioma, hemangiosarcoma, lymphangiosarcoma.
vascular nevus
irregular shaped, cutaneous mass, congenital, hair-covered initially, subsequently hairless, usually 1-2 inches diameter in foals, may be inflamed, ulcerated; composed of densely packed blood vessels and bleed easily: most located on lower limbs; see also nevus.
vascular occlusive syndrome
complete occlusion of the vessel supplying blood to a part of the body causes temporary loss of function or death of the part, fall in temperature and change in color.
vascular plaque
a minor lesion in animals; manifested by slight thickening and wrinkling of the intima of the vessel over oval or elongated elevations.
vascular pole
the point on the renal glomerulus where the blood vessels enter and exit.
vascular prosthesis
see vascular conduit.
vascular ring anomaly
see vascular ring.
vascular sinus transformation
marked dilation of sinuses in lymph nodes because of blockage of drainage from the node.
vascular stasis
serious slowing, or complete cessation, of blood or lymph flow through vessels.
vascular system
the vessels of the body including aorta, arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venules, sinusoids, sinuses, veins, lymphatics.
vascular tone
the state of contractile tension in the vessel walls.
vascular tumor
see vascular neoplasm (above).
vascular tunic
of the eye; consists of the choroid coat, the ciliary body and the iris.
References in periodicals archive ?
1 The term angiosarcoma applies to a wide range of malignant endothelial vascular neoplasms that affect a variety of sites.
Wilms tumor 1 expression in vascular neoplasms and vascular malformations.
In excision, extensive sampling and immunohistochemical workup of what is deemed to be a vascular neoplasm of the kidney is needed to rule out the presence of individual carcinoma cells or small clusters of carcinoma cells.
12) Fli-1 nuclear localization by immunohistochemistry has proven useful in identifying vascular neoplasms, including EHE.
Primary vascular neoplasms unique to the spleen: littoral cell angioma and splenic hamartoma diagnosis by fine-needle aspiration biopsy.
7,8) Using immunohistochemical stains, Miettinen and Fetsch (9) have found that normal endothelial cells and a spectrum of vascular neoplasms can express different types of keratins, some of which exhibit consistent focal immunoreactivity.
From the archives of the AFIP: primary vascular neoplasms of the spleen: radiologic-pathologic correlation.
It discusses differential diagnosis; clinical, morphologic, immunohistochemical, and genetic features; and characteristic traits of mimics of adipocytic neoplasms, fibroblastic/myofibroblastic and fibrohystiocytic neoplasms, smooth muscle and skeletal muscle neoplasms, vascular neoplasms, neuroectodermal neoplasms, neoplasms of uncertain differentiation, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, osseous neoplasms, and cartilaginous neoplasms.
The infrequent exposure of pathologists to vascular neoplasms coupled with overlapping histologic patterns can often make diagnosis challenging as undifferentiated malignant neoplasms are a daunting diagnostic problem for anatomical pathologists, calling for a tour de force in morphological skill, clinicopathologic correlation, and application of adjunctive laboratory studies.
Rare causes have been complicated by the development of vascular neoplasms that resemble Kaposi Sarcoma or Hodgkin's lymphoma.