vascular dementia


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dementia

 [dĕ-men´shah]
a general loss of cognitive abilities, including impairment of memory as well as one or more of the following: aphasia, apraxia, agnosia, or disturbed planning, organizing, and abstract thinking abilities. It does not include loss of intellectual functioning caused by clouding of consciousness (as in delirium), depression, or other functional mental disorder (pseudodementia). Causes include a large number of conditions, some reversible and some progressive, that result in widespread cerebral damage or dysfunction. The most common cause is Alzheimer's disease; others include cerebrovascular disease, central nervous system infection, brain trauma or tumors, vitamin deficiencies, anoxia, metabolic conditions, endocrine conditions, immune disorders, prion diseases, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, normal-pressure hydrocephalus, Huntington's chorea, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease.
dementia of the Alzheimer type official name for alzheimer's disease.
Binswanger's dementia a progressive dementia of presenile onset due to demyelination of the subcortical white matter of the brain, with sclerotic changes in the blood vessels supplying it.
boxer's dementia a syndrome more serious than boxer's traumatic encephalopathy, the result of cumulative injuries to the brain in boxers; characterized by forgetfulness, slowness in thinking, dysarthric speech, and slow, uncertain movements, especially of the legs.
epileptic dementia a progressive mental and intellectual deterioration that occurs in a small fraction of cases of epilepsy; it is thought by some to be caused by degeneration of neurons resulting from circulatory disturbances during seizures.
multi-infarct dementia vascular d.
paralytic dementia (dementia paraly´tica) general paresis.
dementia prae´cox (obs.) schizophrenia.
presenile dementia name given to dementia of the Alzheimer type when it occurs in persons younger than age 65.
senile dementia name given to dementia of the Alzheimer type when it occurs in persons aged 65 or older.
substance-induced persisting dementia that resulting from exposure to or use or abuse of a substance, such as alcohol, sedatives, anxiolytics, anticonvulsants, lead, mercury, carbon monoxide, or organophosphate insecticides, but persisting long after exposure to the substance ends, usually with permanent and worsening deficits. Individual cases are named for the specific substance involved.
vascular dementia patchy deterioration of intellectual function resulting from damage by a significant cerebrovascular disorder.

vas·cu·lar de·men·ti·a

a steplike deterioration in intellectual functions with focal neurologic signs, as the result of multiple infarctions of the cerebral hemispheres.

vascular dementia

Neurology A potentially preventable form of dementia, in which cerebral atrophy is due to various types of CVAs, resulting in variably-sized infarcts. See Multi-infarct dementia, Stroke. Cf Alzheimer's disease.

vas·cu·lar de·men·ti·a

(vas'kyū-lăr dĕ-men'shē-ă)
A steplike deterioration in intellectual functions with focal neurologic signs, as the result of multiple infarctions of the cerebral hemispheres.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reading ability appears to be maintained in the early stages of AD and vascular dementia, while semantic processing of the words seems to be affected; this means that patients have the ability to read written material but are shown to have slower eye movements while doing so, which may be due to patients not understanding what words mean; hence it may take AD and vascular dementia patients longer to read than other people of their age.
Prevalence estimates of Vascular Dementia in developing countries range from 0.6% to 2.1% in those aged over 65 years.
Vascular dementia is caused by reduced blood supply to the brain due to diseased or damaged blood vessels, and according to the analysis, this is exactly what happened to Clinton when she suffered serious concussion four years ago.
There's a lot you can do to stay healthy and avoid vascular dementia. And those strategies will benefit your whole body, not just your brain.
REDUCE THE RISK Cardiovascular disease and vascular dementia are linked to high blood pressure, high cholesterol and being overweight in mid-life.
"Mild cognitive impairment is a clinical term used to describe the presence of cognitive abnormality greater than expected in relation to a person's age and level of education and can represent an increased risk factor for Alzheimer's and vascular dementia.
Patients with vascular dementia commonly have mood and behavioral changes.
Long recognized as one of the major secondary causes of dementia is vascular dementia (VaD), accounting for about 10-20% of dementia cases.
My mother had vascular dementia, so I know from personal experience the devastating impact this condition has on everyone touched by it - and how important it is to know that support is out there when you need it.
They also had a 172 percent increased risk of vascular dementia over the
Other types of dementia include vascular dementia, Lewy body dementia, and Parkinson's dementia.
The risk was increased for both Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia, and followed the same pattern for men and women.