varus


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Related to varus: varus knee

varus

 [va´rus] (L.)
bent or twisted inward; denoting a deformity in which the angulation of the part is toward the midline of the body, as in talipes varus.

va·rus

(va'rŭs), This form of the adjective is used only with masculine nouns (metatarsus varus, plural metatarsi vari. With feminine nouns the form vara is used (tibia vara, plural tibiae varae), and with neuter nouns the form varum (genu varum, plural genua vara). Do not confuse this word with valgus.
Latin adjective describing any joint in an extremity that is deformed in such a way that the more distal of the two bones forming the joint deviates toward the midline, as in bowleg.
[Mod. L. bent inward, fr. L. knock-kneed]

varus

(vâr′əs, văr′-)
n.
An abnormal position of a bone of the leg or foot.

varus

Orthopedics A fixation of a part in the position assumed if it were inverted–in a frontal plane, fixation where the plantar surface is directed toward the midline

va·rus

(var'ŭs)
Descriptive of any of the paired joints of the limbs with a static angular deformity in which the bone distal to the joint deviates medially from the longitudinal axis of the proximal bone, and toward the midline of the body, when the subject is in the anatomic position. The adjective varus is attached sometimes to the name of the joint (cubitus varus) and sometimes to the name of the body part just distal to the joint (hallux varus). The gender of the adjective matches that of the Latin noun to which it is joined; thus, cubitus, hallux, metatarsus, pes, talipes varus; coxa, manus, talipomanus vara; genu varum.
Compare: valgus
[Mod. L. bent inward, fr. L. knock-kneed]

varus

(va'rus) [L, varus, vara, varum, bent, bent inward, knock-knee(d)]
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KNOCK-KNEE: In medical usage, referred to as “valgus knee” or “genu valgum.”
Bent or turned inward, used esp. of deformities in which the most distal anatomical part is turned inward and toward the midline of the body. The classical Latin adjective varus, vara, varum means “knock-knee” or “knock-kneed” and applies to the appearance of the defect. The modern medical Latin adjective applies to the cause of the defect; thus a “varus knee” is caused by the inward bending of the tibia and fibula (towards the center of the body), resulting in “genu varum, ” or “bowleg.” See: illustration; valgus
References in periodicals archive ?
In the varus knee, the contracted structures include the pes anserine tendons, the superficial medial collateral ligament, the posteromedial corner and semimembranosus muscle insertion, the medial joint capsule, and the deep medial collateral ligament (MCL).
No limp or pain position Good Walks well, uses stick to <10[degrees] varus and go out minimal shortening Fair Requires stick, considerable 10[degrees]-25[degrees] of limp or pain varus and 0.5 to 1 in of shortening Poor Bedridden or confined Severe malunion, varus to chair deformity of [greater than or equal to]25 [degrees] or >1 in of shortening Table 4.
Ten subjects (out of 11) from the varus group, eight (out of 11) from the neutral group, and five (out of 10) from the valgus group showed an internal knee abduction moment, while the rest of the participants showed an internal knee adduction moment (Figure 2).
Although both biochemical and mechanical factors affect cartilage degeneration, mechanical factors may play a more important role.[26],[27] The OA group had approximately normal ACLs, MCLs, and lateral menisci, which ensured good protection of the lateral compartment.[28],[29],[30] Furthermore, the varus angles were limited within 15[degrees], with a mean of 7.7 [+ or -] 3.5[degrees].
Caption: Figure 7: Varus collapse of subtrochanteric femur fractures: This diagram illustrates and provides a radiographic example of a subtrochanteric fracture varus nonunion.
Physical exam showed pain and sign of instability such as positive pivot shift, which had to be confirmed under fluoroscopy; clinical attitude in the elbow varus was less evident than in the first case.
Calcaneus Inverted & Navicular Raised = Supinated Compensations: Distal = Plantar flex 1st Ray, Proximal = Varus Tibia Compensated Calcaneus Vertical & Navicular Collapse = Pronated Gait Assessment
The clinical and radiographic results of intertrochanteric curved varus osteotomy for idiopathic osteonecrosis of the femoral head.
Two patients in intramedullary group had poor results, one was due to infection (subsequent ankylosis of hip) and the other one due to z effect (subsequent varus collapse).
Varus displacement of the distal limb at the level of the intertarsal joint without significant rotational displacement is suggestive of disruption of the lateral collateral ligament and joint retinaculum.
The pain scores among the 3 hindfoot alignment groups (valgus, neutral, and varus) were analyzed with either a one-way or two-way ANOVA, as appropriate, and a Tukey post hoc test.
(4,5) Biomechanically, the PLC structures primarily restrain tibial varus, external rotation, and posterior translation movement.