variola


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Related to variola: variola major, variola virus, variola minor, variola vaccine, vaccinia

variola

 [vah-ri´o-lah]
smallpox. adj., adj vari´olar, vario´lous.
variola mi´nor a mild form of smallpox having a low fatality rate.

small·pox

(smawl'poks),
An acute eruptive contagious disease caused by a poxvirus (Orthopoxvirus, a member of the family Poxviridae) and marked at the onset by chills, high fever, backache, and headache. In 2-5 days these constitutional symptoms subside and an eruption appears as papules, which become umbilicated vesicles, develop into pustules, dry, and form scabs that, on falling off, leave a permanent marking of the skin (pock marks). The average incubation period is 8-14 days. As a result of increasingly aggressive vaccination programs carried out over a period of about 200 years, smallpox is now extinct.
Synonym(s): variola major, variola
[E. small pocks, or pustules]

Smallpox was a universally dreaded scourge for more than 3 millennia, with case fatality rates sometimes exceeding 20%. In many ways a unique disease, it had no nonhuman reservoir species and no asymptomatic human carriers. First subjected to some control by variolation in the 10th century in India and China, it was gradually suppressed in the industrialized world after Edward Jenners 1776 landmark demonstration that infection with the harmless cowpox (vaccinia) virus renders humans immune to the smallpox virus. The last case diagnosed in the U.S. occurred in 1949. A global eradication program was initiated by the World Health Organization in 1966, and the last naturally occurring case of the disease was reported in Somalia in 1977. Routine vaccination against smallpox, discontinued in the 1970s, has been resumed for military and health care personnel and others who would be at high risk if smallpox virus should be used as a weapon of biologic warfare or bioterrorism.

variola

/va·ri·o·la/ (vah-ri´o-lah) smallpox.vari´olarvari´olous

variola

(və-rī′ə-lə, vâr′ē-ō′lə, văr′-)
n.

variola, variola major

See smallpox.

va·ri·o·la

(var-ī'ō-lă)
1. Species type of the genus Orthopoxvirus that causes human smallpox.
2. Smallpox.
[Med. L. dim of L. varius, spotted]

variola

An alternative term for SMALLPOX.

va·ri·o·la

(vă-rī'ō-lă)
1. Species type of the genus Orthopoxvirus that causes human smallpox.
2. Smallpox.
[Med. L. dim of L. varius, spotted]

variola (ver´ēō´lə),

n (smallpox), an acute, viral, contagious disease transmitted by the respiratory route and direct contact. The incubation period is 1 to 2 weeks. Manifestations include headache, chills, and temperature up to 106° F. On the third and fourth day, macules appear, which then become papules; then constitutional symptoms abate. On the sixth day the papules become vesicles. The vesicles then become pustules, with desquamation occurring in about 2 weeks. It has been eradicated in the United States due to vaccination.

variola

a viral disease of humans and primates characterized by fever, rash and scab formation. Called also smallpox.
References in periodicals archive ?
We used the LRN as a conduit to maintain the confidentiality and anonymity of the variola testing sites.
Aside from its great size and the fact that it bordered on every state in the region, in the middle of the 1960s it was the only country with endemic smallpox, for the most part variola minor.
These studies demonstrate the production of an interferon binding protein by variola virus and monkeypox virus, and point at this viral anti-interferon protein as a target to develop new therapeutics and protect people from smallpox and related viruses," said Antonio Alcami, Ph.
Magra, de estatura baixa e cabelos escuros, tinha a pele morena marcada pelas cicatrizes de variola, contraida quando ainda era crianca.
16) Apart from admitting no direct link of the loss of infectivity for people, this statement makes it clear that the tests were conducted on the mildest form of smallpox, alastrim, or Variola minor.
Issues addressed at this WHA included strengthening pandemic influenza preparedness and response; infant and young child nutrition; HIV/AIDS; polio eradication; sickle-cell anaemia; smallpox eradication and the destruction of variola virus stocks; prevention of avoidable blindness; international trade and health; tobacco control; and intellectual property rights.
Poxviruses including Variola (small pox), and Vaccinia, which is used to vaccinate against small pox have developed numerous methods for altering and/or evading an immune response.
The CDC also has identified an "A" list of biological agents of highest concern, which includes (a) variola major (smallpox), (b) Bacillus anthracis (anthrax), (c) Yersinia pestis (plague), (d) Francisella tularensis (tularemia), (e) botulinum toxin (botulism), and (f) filoviruses and arenaviruses (viral hemorrhagic fevers).
Smallpox variola major has infected people for thousands of years.
So when you lie down in the red cell you can see the bacteria in our throat and intestines that can generate syphilis, pneumonia, tetanus, and cholera--plus models of viruses for HIV, flu, herpes, variola, and polio.
The word variola was commonly used for smallpox and had been introduced by Bishop Marius of Avenches (near Lausanne, Switzerland) in AD 570.