variola


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variola

 [vah-ri´o-lah]
smallpox. adj., adj vari´olar, vario´lous.
variola mi´nor a mild form of smallpox having a low fatality rate.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

small·pox

(smawl'poks),
An acute eruptive contagious disease caused by a poxvirus (Orthopoxvirus, a member of the family Poxviridae) and marked at the onset by chills, high fever, backache, and headache. In 2-5 days these constitutional symptoms subside and an eruption appears as papules, which become umbilicated vesicles, develop into pustules, dry, and form scabs that, on falling off, leave a permanent marking of the skin (pock marks). The average incubation period is 8-14 days. As a result of increasingly aggressive vaccination programs carried out over a period of about 200 years, smallpox is now extinct.
Synonym(s): variola major, variola
[E. small pocks, or pustules]

Smallpox was a universally dreaded scourge for more than 3 millennia, with case fatality rates sometimes exceeding 20%. In many ways a unique disease, it had no nonhuman reservoir species and no asymptomatic human carriers. First subjected to some control by variolation in the 10th century in India and China, it was gradually suppressed in the industrialized world after Edward Jenners 1776 landmark demonstration that infection with the harmless cowpox (vaccinia) virus renders humans immune to the smallpox virus. The last case diagnosed in the U.S. occurred in 1949. A global eradication program was initiated by the World Health Organization in 1966, and the last naturally occurring case of the disease was reported in Somalia in 1977. Routine vaccination against smallpox, discontinued in the 1970s, has been resumed for military and health care personnel and others who would be at high risk if smallpox virus should be used as a weapon of biologic warfare or bioterrorism.

Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

variola

(və-rī′ə-lə, vâr′ē-ō′lə, văr′-)
n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

va·ri·o·la

(var-ī'ō-lă)
1. Species type of the genus Orthopoxvirus that causes human smallpox.
2. Smallpox.
[Med. L. dim of L. varius, spotted]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

variola

An alternative term for SMALLPOX.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

va·ri·o·la

(vă-rī'ō-lă)
1. Species type of the genus Orthopoxvirus that causes human smallpox.
2. Smallpox.
[Med. L. dim of L. varius, spotted]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
PROF GEOFFREY SMITH: "Of course, when one thinks of variola virus, the cause of smallpox, such activity is absolutely prohibited.
Em torno de 6 da tarde do dia 10 de novembro, alguns jovens estudantes, no Largo de Sao Francisco, desceram a rua do Ouvidor e um deles, Jayme Cohen, comecou a protestar resistencia a vacina contra variola. Quando um delegado de policia intimou Jayme para ir a delegacia, ocorreu uma reacao das pessoas presentes em face da acao policial.
Eradication was made possible by the ability of vaccinia virus to induce cross-protective immunity against other viruses within the orthopoxvirus genus capable of producing human infection (e.g., variola, monkeypox, and cowpox) (3).
Although closely related to the variola virus that causes smallpox, it is generally harmless to humans.
During decades, VACV was used as the vaccine strain in the world programme of eradication of smallpox, due to its low virulence and antigenic similarity with the agent of smallpox, variola virus (VarV) (BAXBY, 1977).