variate

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var·i·ate

(var'ē-āt),
A measurable quantity capable of taking on a number of values; may be binary (that is, capable of taking on two values in a certain interval of values), continuous (i.e., capable of taking on all values in a certain interval of real values), or discrete (that is, capable of taking on a limited number of values in a certain interval of real values).

var·i·ate

(var'ē-āt)
Measurable quantity capable of taking on a number of values; may be binary, continuous, or discrete.
References in periodicals archive ?
The dimension reduction analysis indicated that three out of four canonical variates were significant.
We organized the 257 specimens into one sample for a principal components analysis (PCA) and 13 samples for a canonical variate analysis (CVA) to search for patterns of geographic variation.
Scatter plots of the 1st versus the 2nd canonical variates for all datasets indicated that tight and distinctive groupings occur when k = 3 or 4; scatter plots for three clusters are given in Figure 2.
Both the variates mutually shared 36 per cent variance (the derived values such as squares or square roots of a number may not exactly tally because of rounding off up to two places after decimal).
This is an estimate of the shared variance between the canonical variates from the two sets.
The magnitude and direction of the canonical correlation between these two canonical variates ([R.
The optimal control variates are solutions of the first-order conditions (note that the objective function is convex); we get
Data on the first pair of canonical variates are highlighted in Table 1.
The first and third variates also indicate that low-cost producers tend to align with other low-cost producers which supports H8.
Basic data of study subjects (a) Men Women Total Variates Mean SD Mean SD Mean SD Age (y) (b) 49.
Three groups were readily discernible in a plot of the first two canonical variates (Fig.
The second pair of variates indicated that endorsement of belief in extraordinary life forms and superstitions might often be found in people, particularly men, with a conviction that they are victims of bad luck.