vanadium


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Related to vanadium: vanadium steel, vanadyl sulfate

vanadium

 [vah-na´de-um]
a chemical element, atomic number 23, atomic weight 50.942, symbol V. (See Appendix 6.) Its salts have been used in treating various diseases. Absorption of its compounds, usually via the lungs, causes chronic intoxication, the symptoms of which include respiratory tract irritation, pneumonitis, conjunctivitis, and anemia.

va·na·di·um (V),

(vă-nā'dē-ŭm),
A metallic element, atomic no. 23, atomic wt. 50.9415; a bioelement, its deficiency can result in abnormal bone growth and a rise in cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels.
[Vanadis, Scand. goddess]

vanadium

/va·na·di·um/ (vah-na´de-um) a chemical element, at. no. 23, symbol V. Its salts have been used in treating various diseases. Absorption of its compounds, usually via the lungs, causes chronic intoxication, the symptoms of which include respiratory tract irritation, pneumonitis, conjunctivitis, and anemia.

vanadium (V)

[vənā′dē·əm]
Etymology: ONorse, Vanadis, Freya, goddess of fertility
a grayish metallic element. Its atomic number is 23; its atomic mass is 50.942. Absorption of vanadium compounds results in a condition called vanadiumism, characterized by anemia, conjunctivitis, pneumonitis, and irritation of the respiratory tract.

vanadium

A metallic element (atomic number 23; atomic weight 50.94) present in trace amounts in the environment, which has an uncertain role in humans. Some data suggest that vanadium may lower serum glucose; participate in cholesterol, triglyceride and bone metabolism and in hormone production; and possibly protect against cancer. Vanadium is present in fish, liver, nuts, root vegetables, vegetable oils and whole grains; a vanadium deficiency state is not known to exist in humans.

va·na·di·um

(vă-nā'dē-ŭm)
A metallic element, atomic no. 23, atomic wt. 50.9415; a bioelement; a dietary deficiency can result in abnormal bone growth and a rise in cholesterol and triglyceride levels.
[Vanadis, Scand. goddess]

vanadium (v·nāˑ·dē·m),

n an element/mineral thought by some to be essential for health. Has been used for its antidiabetic properties. Vanadium is toxic (nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic, and teratogenic) in excess and can accumulate in tissues. Caution is advised for patients with severe kidney or liver conditions and for those taking antidiabetic medications. Also called
vanadyl sulfate or
vanadate.

vanadium

a chemical element, atomic number 23, atomic weight 50.942, symbol V. See Table 6. Its salts have been used in treating various diseases.

vanadium poisoning
in humans poisoning is usually by inhalation causing respiratory irritation and pneumonia. In livestock poisoning is by ingestion of contaminated pasture and manifested by diarrhea, incoordination and oliguria.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another research titled 2015 China Vanadium Industry forecasts the market analysis provided for the China markets including development trends, competitive landscape analysis, and key regions development status.
This nano-scale microscopic muscle with more than 1000x human strength that was created by Berkeley researchers using vanadium dioxide is truly a breakthrough because despite its small size, it is very powerful and functional.
Ironstone, in conjunction with HATCH, has developed an enhanced direct reduced iron and segregation technology, originally developed on a lab scale by the Alberta Research Council, for beneficiating ubiquitous oolitic ironstones into iron metallics and extracting by-products such as vanadium pentoxide and other economic minerals.
Administration of vanadium and/or nickel caused significant decrease in fluid intake.
At current commodity spot prices, uranium brings about S68 per pound, while vanadium brings $7 per pound.
In studies [2-6] data are presented on the processes of carbo-, silico- and alumothermic reduction and melting in ore heat-treating furnaces from the NTMK converter slag of vanadium hardeners with weight share of vanadium from 8 to 15 %, among which the most acceptable from the economic viewpoint are two first mentioned methods.
Exposure to excessive vanadium may also produce adverse effects on the cardiovascular system.
According to the Johannesburg research outfit the country's vanadium alloy capacity rose from 3,500 tonnes per year in 1993 to 14,000 tonnes per year by the end of 1995.
In the presence of magnesium, vanadium forms non-corrosive compounds with high melting points during combustion.
While other coating processes leave a layer of coating material on the surface, TD diffuses vanadium carbide into and onto the metal.
molybdenum, vanadium and chromium limitations for iron.