van der Waals force


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van der Waals force

(văn′ dər wôlz′, wälz′)
n.
A weak attractive force between atoms or nonpolar molecules caused by an instantaneous dipole moment of one atom or molecule that induces a similar temporary dipole moment in adjacent atoms or molecules.
References in periodicals archive ?
where [F.sub.vdw] is the van der Waals force, [l.sub.c] is the CNT/Au contact length on C4, k is the spring constant of C4, and [[delta].sub.max] is the maximum deformation at the moment of CNT release.
In order to compare to the maximum value that van der Waals force can afford, we make an integral of shear stress to the bonding area along the tube length as follows:
Elastic moduli of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and the effect of van der Waals forces. Composites Sci.
Neighboring particles are attracted into contact by the van der Waals force between them, much of which originates in their surface zones.
The total force of the system, including the electrostatic force and van der Waals force, is given by:
By comparing tensile force and van der Waals force, the tensile force was evidently larger.
The rods applied tension to the thread in order to increase the interactions between the CNTs and to enhance the van der Waals forces between the individual carbon nanotubes.
As the probe approached the sample surface, the van der Waals force would be transmitted to the cantilever, altering its vibrational frequency.
According to the researchers, the change in van der Waals force was calculated due to the relative transverse movement of the two nanotubes in the presented model, and its effect on the movement of nanostructures containing perpendicular nanotubes was investigated.
According to Li, the force that holds the two nanoribbons together is a weak electrostatic attraction called the van der Waals force. (This is the same force that allows the gecko to walk up walls.)
Washington, Jan 26 (ANI): Inspired by how a gecko sticks to the smoothest of surfaces via strong van der Waals force between its millions of hairs, researchers at Rice University have come up with a way to transfer forests of strongly aligned, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from one surface to any other surface in a matter of minutes.
The hairs cling to surfaces using molecular interactions known as the Van der Waals force. The force helps support the gecko's weight as it scrambles up vertical surfaces.