van der Waals force


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van der Waals force

(văn′ dər wôlz′, wälz′)
n.
A weak attractive force between atoms or nonpolar molecules caused by an instantaneous dipole moment of one atom or molecule that induces a similar temporary dipole moment in adjacent atoms or molecules.
References in periodicals archive ?
How important the van der Waals force is, and the way in which it flattens particles--if indeed it can--seem poorly assessed: at least the authors have found neither unequivocal data nor convincing discussion.
The total force of the system, including the electrostatic force and van der Waals force, is given by:
Unfortunately, says Dhinojwala, the plastic rods "are not mechanically strong, and they try to clump together" He attributes the carbon nanotubes' extraordinary adhesion to both van der Waals forces and to their strength and flexibility under strain.
The successive layers of talc are bonded together only by weak van der Waals forces.
3~, for example, is comprised of Mo-O octahedra connected to form a 2D-sheet lattice 7 |Angstrom~ thick, in which the sheets are bonded together by Van der Waals forces.
The single layer of graphene was so thin that it did not significantly disrupt the non-bonding van der Waals forces that control the interaction of water with the solid surface.
Anti-adhesion design, supercritical drying, and hydrophobic surface monolayers all help to treat the headaches that occur when van der Waals forces "glue" silicon to silicon.
This mock dirt counteracted the weak van der Waals forces that usually sum into a lizard's tenacious grip on surfaces.
The toes of geckos have amazing characteristics that allow them to adhere to most surfaces and research suggests that they work as result of van der Waals forces - very weak, attractive forces that occur between molecules.
Then we solved the equations by considering the effect of nano scale, Van der Waals forces between the inner and outer carbon nanotubes for double-walled carbon nanotubes in equations of motion, and buckling modes by applying the boundary conditions of the simple fulcrum as sine functions," he added, noting, "Next, we calculated the natural frequencies.
In a liquid film thinner than about 100 nm, intermolecular attractions called van der Waals forces tend to squeeze the film so much that it disappears with a pop, says Dorbolo.