van der Waals force


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van der Waals force

(văn′ dər wôlz′, wälz′)
n.
A weak attractive force between atoms or nonpolar molecules caused by an instantaneous dipole moment of one atom or molecule that induces a similar temporary dipole moment in adjacent atoms or molecules.
References in periodicals archive ?
How important the van der Waals force is, and the way in which it flattens particles--if indeed it can--seem poorly assessed: at least the authors have found neither unequivocal data nor convincing discussion.
The total force of the system, including the electrostatic force and van der Waals force, is given by:
Manifestations of the electromagnetic force range from the van der Waals forces of attraction between molecules and atoms to the postulated Casimir-Polder interaction between a neutral atom and an electrically conducting plate.
Because the adhesions were very different, the team concluded that van der Waals forces don't fully explain how geckos stick to walls.
As an undergraduate at the University of California, Berkeley, she started a research project examining climbing gecko lizards, and ultimately discovered that geckos stick to surfaces using van der Waals forces.
Organic semiconductors differ from more conventional kinds by being held together by van der Waals forces rather than covalent bonds, and so have narrow electronic bandwidths, and charge carriers that are localized and have smaller mobilities.
For deagglomeration, it is necessary that the van der Waals forces are smaller than the dispersion force.
It's all down to van der Waals forces, but you knew that.
An interdisciplinary team of researchers, led by Autumn, later confirmed speculation that the gecko's climbing ability depends on van der Waals forces, which are weak electrodynamic forces that operate over very small distances but bond to nearly any material.
In the 16 October 2003 Advanced Materials article, Lee explains: "In the natural state, [montmorillonite] platelets are held together by van der Waals forces and electrostatic forces to form crystallites (tactoids).
Typically, foam-causing components stabilize foam because of ionic forces, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals forces.