vampirism


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A term that has been applied to a broad array of conditions and situations that the original authors of various reports linked to some aspect of mythical blood-sucking human vampires, or the fictional Count Dracula
Lab medicine Anaemia of investigation, iatrogenic anaemia, nosocomial anaemia, vampirism A fanciful and completely unnecessary synonym for hypochromic anaemia resulting from multiple phlebotomies, which is especially common in ITU/ICU patients
Anaemia of investigation can be reduced in frequency and severity by using paediatric—2.5–3.0 mL—instead of adult sized—4.5–10 mL—blood collection tubes
Medspeak A term coined in 1995 referring to the decrease of serum proteins—hypoalbuminemia and lipids-hypocholesterolemia—which was linked to sufferers’ frequent sale of plasma
Medical history Porphyria has been proposed as an explanation for the vampire legend, based on certain real or perceived similarities between the two. The similarities between porphyria and vampire syndrome include (1) photosensitivity/sensitivity to the sunlight, resulting in skin pallor in both; (2) congenital erythropoietic porphyria is characterised by very high levels of red-brown or burgundy-red porphyrin pigments with an affinity for calcium phosphate, resulting in incorporation into the teeth during odontogenesis. Permanent teeth range from pink to rare cases of red-brown or purple; (3) madness, sober moods and depression; (4) its occurrence in royals—e.g., Mary Queen of Scots, her father, James V—and, farther east and more linked to the legend, its occurrence in Vlad III the Impaler, aka Prince of Wallachia, aka Dracula; the alleged occurrence of porphyria in George III is far from proven. Systemic lupus has some vampire features, but is not traditionally linked to the vampire myth
Psychiatry Clinical vampirism A deviant behaviour in which blood is ingested, variably accompanied by necrophilia, often in a background of schizophrenia, psychosis, sadomasochism, cultism—e.g., voodoo rituals, cannibalism, fetishism or drug intoxication. See Necrophilia
Psychology Psychic vampire A morose person who, Dracula-like, sucks the life out of others because of his/her negative attitudes. They are gloomy, self-centred and can’t be helped
Sexual health A term of art referring to what some regard as a myth of male child sexual assault, i.e, that boys who are sexually abused, like the victims of Count Dracula, will go on to bite—i.e., sexually abuse—others

vampirism

The practice of drinking blood Clinical medicine A quasi-facetious term for excessive blood tests, which causes iatrogenic anemia. See Anemia of investigation Psychiatry A deviant behavior in which blood is ingested, variably accompanied by necrophilia, often in a background of schizophrenia, psychosis, sadomasochism, cult–eg, voodoo rituals, cannibalism, fetishism or drug intoxication. See Necrophilia.
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As such, any doom or punishments inflicted upon those Victorian vampires hardly arouse any pity in readers, and even in those cases where readers sympathize with or like vampires to some degree, the reasons for those feelings are not related to their vampirism but to their denial of it.
(47) However, Zimbabwe surpassed this record of vampirism and spent thrift in 2016 when Robert Mugabe spent more than $50 million dollars on foreign trips, double the amount allocated to the upgrading of Zimbabwe's hospitals and health facilities.
In offering up vampirism as a solution to the dilemma of the female subject, Twilight raises the specter of monstrosity in order to leave gender disruptions behind.
Examples of the unethical abusiveness of the AKP to which E[pounds sterling]nal referred as "emotional vampirism" are countless.
In this essay I will explore these questions by undertaking a nonanthropocentric discussion of vampirism in Dracula, employing an EcoGothic approach to examine how the relation between the consumption of human and nonhuman flesh and blood reflects the evolving meaning of species, nation, and gender in nineteenth-century industrial society.
This is a dark, long and complex addition to the YA vampire novel genre and it continues the trend of inventing ever more complicated rules for vampirism and its spread and control.
That Brutus, like his hated son, participates in an act of vampirism suggests that the republicans may be no better than the royalists they replace" (128-29).
London, Feb 10 ( ANI ): A man from Turkey, who became addicted to drinking human blood, has been described by doctors as having "vampirism".
It's a downbeat little movie but its depiction of vampirism as an affliction rather than a superpower is certainly thought provoking.
Striking a deft balance of silly, straight-faced and splattery, helmer Timur Bekmambetov and writer Seth Grahame-Smith spin an agreeably daft, fang-in-cheek tribute to America's 16th president and his ax-wielding campaign to abolish a nationwide outbreak of vampirism. South-will-rise-again types may take issue with the pic's vision of Confederate forces in cahoots with vicious bloodsuckers; others should lap it up, spelling potent if possibly short-lived summer B.O.
"The bourgeois vampire and nineteenth-century identity theft" and "Dracula: vampiric contagion in the late nineteenth century." Part 3 is dedicated to Germany: "Vampirism, the writing cure, and realpolitik: Daniel Paul Schreber's Memoirs of my nervous illness" and "Vampires in Weimar: shades of history." The conclusion looks at "The vampire in the Americas and beyond."
Royal--who is serving a life sentence for charges including aggravated assault, robbery and escape--filed a civil rights suit against prison officials two years ago, claiming that they would not let him practice religious beliefs related to vampirism.