vampire bat

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vam·pire bat

a member of the genus Desmodus; an important reservoir host of rabies virus in Central and South America.

vampire bat

n.
1. Any of several bats of the subfamily Desmodontinae, found in subtropical and tropical regions of the Americas, that bite mammals and birds to feed on their blood and that often carry diseases such as rabies.
2. Any of various other bats, as those of the family Megadermatidae, erroneously believed to feed on blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
The second chapter, "The Science Fiction Vampire in Literature," discusses how the creature moved from folklore and into literature.
"When you were made as a very young vampire, a lot of other vampires were made at the same time.
Vampires flock to Transylvania to celebrate the coming of age of birthday boy, Rudolph Sackville-Bagg (voiced by Rasmus Hardiker).
Alab Pilipinas tore Mono Vampire apart in overtime in Game One with Deguara out on fouls.
Harkup, who lectures on vampires to get people interested in science, said she had one unfulfilled ambition – to become a real vampire hunter She said: "I've never been called in to investigate a vampire case yet.
While I was looking into this, I noticed how often vampires were used as images in the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations I was reporting on.
Remind the current vampire novelists what a real vampire book is all about," said another.
The Japanese invention of a synthetic blood drink called TruBlood, allows the vampires living outside the human world to "come out of the coffin." They do not need to hunt people anymore, they can live among them and drink their favorite blood type heated to the preferable 36.6 C (97.8 F); however, not everyone is thrilled with this.
Frayling identified the dominant archetypal vampires as they emerge in fiction: the Byronic vampire (or 'Satanic Lord'), the Fatal Woman, the Unseen Force, the Folkloric Vampire, the 'camp' vampire, and the vampire as creative force.
"You can't kill me, I'm already dead: A vampire anthology" presents the chronicles behind modern vampires and provides a chronological tour through vampire literature.
This is a different take on the Vampire genre, presenting as somewhat satirical.
The fascinating capacity of the vampire to have multiple meanings allows for an analysis of the discourses that construct the vampire in the first place.