value-based insurance design

value-based insurance design

,

VBID

A health insurance plan that charges patients less for those services that are deemed to be the most helpful to them and more for services that are elective or of relatively low value, i.e., provide little health benefit.
References in periodicals archive ?
Todays executive order follows several years of Thunes and Carpers efforts to advance value-based insurance design for HSA-eligible HDHPs.
We continue our work on these vexing issues, as has Altarum, which has teamed with the Center for Value-based Insurance Design on a research consortium to address low-value care.
The most recent trend to capture our attention is the re-emergence of value-based insurance design (VBID).
Value-based insurance design, discussed below, can also steer employees toward the most cost-effective services, rather than just encouraging them to spend less.
Have an easier time finding policies compatible with health savings accounts, and policies based on value-based insurance design principles.
Value-Based Insurance Design (VBID) is an approach used by healthcare payers to promote a patient's use of high-value services.
It also would extend value-based insurance design to Medicare Advantage, would combine Medicare Parts A & B, and would seek to reform uncompensated care.
The partnership will also include a collaborative effort for expanding quality measures, value-based insurance design (VBID) and financial analytics to track and demonstrate approaches to treating complex chronic care patients within underserved communities.
If state regulators prod some health insurers to reduce 2016 rate increases, those insurers may have more of an incentive to use a value-based insurance design, the narrow networks and other mechanisms to hold down benefits costs, the analysts say.
The study, from researchers at CVS Caremark, Aetna, and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, suggests the approach, known as value-based insurance design, might be effective in reducing commonly recognized disparities in cardiovascular care related to patient ethnicity and race.
The study, from researchers at CVS Caremark, Aetna, and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, suggests the approach, known as value-based insurance design, may be effective in reducing commonly recognized disparities in cardiovascular care related to patient ethnicity and race.
Mark Fendrick, director of the University of Michigan's Center for Value-Based Insurance Design and professor of internal medicine.