valsalva manoeuvre


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

valsalva manoeuvre

The effort to breathe out forcibly while the mouth and nose are firmly closed or the vocal cords pressed together. The valsalva manoeuvre is employed while straining at stool and in other circumstances. It causes a rise in blood pressure followed by a sharp drop and then a second sharp rise in blood pressure. This may be dangerous in people with heart disease and should be avoided. (Antonio Maria Valsalva, 1666–1723, Italian anatomist).
References in periodicals archive ?
The standard valsalva manoeuvre was carried out in supine position.
Madhavan, "Spontaneous suprachoroidal haemorrhage following a valsalva manoeuvre," Eye, vol.
After attempting further Valsalva manoeuvres and drinking iced water, I decided it was time to seek help.
Mass may enlarge with Valsalva manoeuvre and on erect position.
Or, take a breath then try to breathe out gently with your mouth closed and pinch your nose (the Valsalva manoeuvre) to gently push air back into the Eustachian tube.
Also there was no secretion from the growth, no transillumination, no expansion of growth with crying, valsalva manoeuvre or no compression of ipsilateral jugular vein.
Finally, during the Valsalva manoeuvre, 1 mL of air was injected, followed by 3 mL of 3% ethoxysclerol (air-block technique).
Kohl-Bareis et al., "Effects of assuming constant optical scattering on haemoglobin concentration measurements using NIRS during a valsalva manoeuvre," in Oxygen Transport to Tissue XXXII, J.
Autonomic cardiovascular tests like the heart rate response to Valsalva manoeuvre, deep breathing and standing and the blood pressure response to standing are also used to study autonomic function in OSA.
Soares, "Impaired autonomic control of heart interval changes to Valsalva manoeuvre in Chagas' disease without overt manifestation." Auton Neuro sci, 2002.
Most cases were related to activities that resulted in a prolonged Valsalva manoeuvre such as coughing, strenuous sport, or the use of inhaled drugs such as cocaine and marijuana (10%).
When you're on land, just a yawn can do the trick, but when you're underwater and with a breathing device in your mouth, the Valsalva manoeuvre is your only defence against an exploding blood vessel and much worse.