valetudinarian


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Related to valetudinarian: viticetum

val·e·tu·di·nar·i·an

(val'ĕ-tū'di-nār'ē-ăn),
1. An invalid or person in chronically poor health.
2. One whose chief concern is his or her invalidism or poor health.
[L. valetudinarius, sickly]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

valetudinarian

(văl′ĭ-to͞od′n-âr′ē-ən, -tyo͞od′-)
n.
A sickly or weak person, especially one who is constantly and morbidly concerned with his or her health.
adj.
1. Chronically ailing; sickly.
2. Constantly and morbidly concerned with one's health.

val′e·tu′di·nar′i·an·ism n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

valetudinarian

An obsolete term for:
(1) A sickly person; invalid;
(2) A person unduly concerned about his or her health; hypochondriac.

Valetudinarian is not used in the working medical parlance.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

valetudinarian

1. A person constantly suffering from one illness or another, especially one deeply preoccupied with ill health.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
"Collected by a Valetudinarian" gives such bonds a central salvific function.
With their anachronistic and bookish air, Lamb's essays have traditionally been viewed as quaint, somewhat quirky exercises in valetudinarian impressionism, retrospective and inward-turning, celebrating the past, especially the past of childhood.
The transformation from a vital, active, daring, and energetic young man into a valetudinarian at the age of thirty is paralleled in the development of his thought.
It is for the backward, and by one of their number, that these sketches were written." Woodress notes Cather's increasingly valetudinarian attitude from 1922 on, her disillusionment with the postwar Jazz Age, the callousness of prosperity--stingy, grasping, extravagant--and the lazy descendants of earlier generations (335-36).
She is further restricted by her valetudinarian father's gentle selfishness, which resists any kind of change and permits a social life limited to his own small circle, exclusive to the degree of admitting only four people as his closest acquaintances and only three to the second group.
Woodhouse and Isabella and their valetudinarian concerns about health and treatments.
And at the pace I can manage these days, could there be a better companion than a valetudinarian Border terrier or an ailing toddler?
The main letter writers-and the only ones to describe Harrogate--in Humphry Clinker are Matthew Bramble, a tetchy but generous-hearted valetudinarian who addresses his letters to his doctor, and his young nephew, Jery Melford, whose correspondent is a fellow student at Oxford.
At a deeper level, finally--drawing on diaries, private correspondence, and contemporary reminiscences and arranging her exposition in diachronic sections ("Scenes from Family Life," "The Victorian," "Pre-Raphaelite," "Artist," "Man of Letters," "Marriage," "Radicals," "The Patient," and "Coda")--Thirlwell has provided readers with an almost Chekhovian account of the passionate bonds which united "William and Lucy," as well as the mingled idealism and insecurity of Lucy Rossetti's temperament in her last valetudinarian decade.
Paul Crumbley's contribution, the final essay in this section, compares Stoddard's story "Collected by a Valetudinarian" to Constance Fenimore Woolson's "Miss Grief."
A contemporary guidebook describes the town as 'the resort of the weary invalid, the fastidious valetudinarian, the wealthy merchant and the thoughtful student'.
A group of people travels through England and Scotland at a pace largely determined by the valetudinarian Matthew Bramble rather than, as was the case in Roderick Random, by the multitude of actions crowding in on the hero.