valerian


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va·le·ri·an

(vă-lē'rē-ăn),
1. The rhizome and roots of Valeriana officinalis (family Valerianaceae), a herb native to southern Europe and northern Asia, cultivated also in the U.K. and the U.S.; has been used as a sedative in hysteria and at menopause.
2. Referring to a class of terpene alkaloids obtained from valerian (1).
Synonym(s): vandal root

valerian

/va·le·ri·an/ (vah-lēr´e-an)
1. a plant of the genus Valeriana.
2. the dried roots, rhizome, and stolons of V. officinalis, which are antispasmodic and sedative and are used for nervousness and insomnia.

valerian

(və-lîr′ē-ən)
n.
1. Any of several plants of the family Valerianaceae, especially Valeriana officinalis, native to Eurasia and widely cultivated for its small, fragrant, white to pink or lavender flowers and for use in medicine.
2. The dried rhizomes of Valeriana officinalis, used medicinally as a sedative.

valerian

a perennial herb native to Eurasia that is now grown worldwide.
uses This herb is used as a sedative, and is generally considered safe and effective for short-term use.
contraindications Valerian should not be used during pregnancy and lactation, in those with known hypersensitivity to this herb, or those with hepatic disease. It should be used only with caution in children, since research is lacking.

valerian

Herbal medicine
A perennial herb that contains alkaloids, actinidine, choline, glycoside, resins, tannins, valepotriates, valerenic acid and volatile oils (including limonene); it is antispasmodic, antitussive, and sedative, and may act on the central nervous system. Valerian has been used for anxiety, colic, dandruff, dyspepsia, headaches, hypertension, insomnia, menstrual cramping, nervousness, stress and tachyarrhythmias.
 
Toxicity
Valerian should not be given to infants, and should be used with caution in pregnant women; in excess, it may cause headaches, irritability and blurred vision.

va·le·ri·an

(vă-ler'ē-ăn)
An herb (Valeriana officinalis) that is used to treat anxiety, insomnia, sleep disorders, and restlessness due to nervous disorders.

valerian (v·lirˑ·ē·n),

n Latin name:
Valeriana officinalis; parts used: rhizomes, roots; uses: anxiolytic, insomnia, nervousness; precautions: GRAS, pregnancy, lactation, children; overdose is hepatotoxic; patients with liver conditions or taking CNS depressants, MAOIs, phenytoin, warfarin. Also called
all heal, amantilla, baldrianwurzel, capon's tail, great wild valerian, herba benedicta, katzenwurzel, phu germanicum, phu parvum, setewale, setwell, theriacaria, or
valeriana.
Enlarge picture
Valerian.
valerian, Greek,
n Latin name:
Polemonium caeruleum; parts used: rhizome and roots; uses: spasm prevention, sedative, anxiety, sleeplessness; precautions: none known. Also called
Jacob's ladder.

valerian

References in periodicals archive ?
Much of the film is devoted to rather leaden banter between the duo -- but the real Achilles' heel in Valerian is the climax, and the last half-hour in general (that said, the film feels shorter than its 137-minute running time).
The special effects-laden romp centres on gung-ho time-travelling agent Major Valerian (DeHaan) and his sassy partner, Sergeant Laureline (Delevingne).
Besson wanted to bring Valerian to the screen in the 1990s, however, constrained by the relatively primitive visual effects technology that was available, he knew it would be some time before he was able to create the wondrous "Valerian and Laureline" universe he knew the source material deserved.
Major Valerian is dispatched to this 'city' to investigate an unknown force that's threatening to destroy the peace in Alpha.
The video also features expert commentary from Producer, Virginie Besson-Silla, Valerian Concept Designer, Ben Mauro, and Lexus Chief Engineer, Takeaki Kato.
Patients were allocated to receive either valerian 530mg or placebo capsule to be taken twice daily for two months.
To thrive, valerian likes full sun with some afternoon shade.
While there is still some debate on the relative effectiveness of various classes of compounds, it is widely accepted that the valerenic acid (contained in its essential oil) is the most important biologically active component and there is substantial industrial interest in increasing the level of this compound in valerian raw material.
We are really excited about Valerian as it is a very bold project and its trajectory will propel us into the future.
Trials that used valerian root dosages of 400 mg to 500 mg tended to report better outcomes.
Women were randomly divided into two groups, with 50 in the herbal treatment group, which received two capsules containing 160 mg of valerian and 80 mg of lemon balm, and 50 in the control group, which received capsules containing starch.
Use 1 to 2 teaspoons of dried valerian root to make a tea.