valency


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va·lence

, valency (vā'lĕns, -len-sē),
The combining power of one atom of an element (or a radical), that of the hydrogen atom being the unit of comparison, determined by the number of electrons in the outer shell of the atom (v. electrons); for example, in HCl, chlorine is monovalent; in H2O, oxygen is bivalent; in NH3, nitrogen is trivalent.
[L. valentia, strength]

valency

(vā′lən-sē)
n.
Variant of valence.

valency

See valence.

va·lence

, valency (vā'lĕns, -ē)
The combining power of one atom of an element (or a radical), that of the hydrogen atom being the unit of comparison, determined by the number of electrons in the outer shell of the atom (v. electrons); e.g., in HCl, chlorine is monovalent; in H2O, oxygen is bivalent; in NH3, nitrogen is trivalent.
[L. valentia, strength]

valency

combining power of an atom, determined by number of electrons in its outer shell

valency (vāˑ·len·sē),

n the number of chemical bonds that an atom of a particular element can form, used as a measure of the chemical reactivity of that element.

va·lence

, valency (vā'lĕns, -sē)
The combining power of one atom of an element (or a radical), that of the hydrogen atom being the unit of comparison, determined by the number of electrons in the outer shell of the atom (v. electrons).
[L. valentia, strength]

valency, valence

1. the numerical measure of the capacity to combine; in chemistry, an expression of the number of atoms of hydrogen (or its equivalent) that one atom of a chemical element can hold in combination, if negative, or displace in a reaction, if positive.
2. in immunology, an expression of the number of antigenic determinants with which one molecule of a given antibody can combine.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Quechua, it holds for the 1st person object marker -wa- which is retained in nonfinite verbs along with the voice and valency markers (passive, reflexive, causative; Cole 1982: 160).
1984 "Adjective complementation: A valency approach to making EFL dictionaries", Applied linguistics 5: 1-11.
One might want to argue, then, that what has been treated here as (syntax-sensitive) instrument inversion is in fact lexical valencyrearrangement: a verb may occur in one of two alternative valency frames in certain sentence types, including the basic, canonical structure, but it can occur in only one valency frame, the "inverted one", when it is not followed by its lexical complement.
I will show that 'give' indeed outranks other verbs of similar valency in formal transitivity in a number of languages.
The syntactic deranking of the agent in the passive, that is, valency reduction, is a way of signaling it low discourse relevance.
Valency and rection paradigms fall within the scope of the general mechanism of proportionality and, hence, share a number of syntactic properties.
14) The following German examples in (13) present a scale of secondary predications, that is, of predicative structures that participate in the semantic finiteness of the main predicate of the sentence, showing at the same time different degrees of morphological finiteness, from verbs, which have valency, to nominal forms, which do not have valency.
1, there is an additional semantic constraint governing auto- prefixation, the agentivity constraint on human external arguments, which cannot be accounted for at the level of argument structure, if we conceive it as a lexical syntactic level of representation devoid of semantic information, specifying the syntactic valency of a predicate as well as the hierarchical disposition of its arguments.
This knowledge may assist in decision making when implementing vaccination strategies as new immunization strategies are needed to tackle the considerable IPD and associated death in adults (39) and in designing new extended valency vaccines or protein-based pneumococcal vaccines that may confer serotype-independent immunity (40).
Creating a correspondence with his technique, Ramesh employs tenebrism or intense contrasts of tonal values of light and shadow in painting the lamps, which enhances the works' conceptual valency.
This perceptual valency was less marked in the I 967 work, in which the critique of the frame was fundamental and predominant.
Arsenic can exist in the environment in several valency states (-3, 0, +3, and +5).