vagrant


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vagrant

(vā′grănt) [L. vagrans]
1. Wandering from place to place without a fixed home.
2. A homeless person who wanders from place to place.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since the creation of Pakistan, vagrants have been living in the same deplorable condition and there has been no upward mobility for generations.
The Last Supper scene features the vagrants that she is sheltering and shows the house descending into debauchery and destruction, instead of the peaceful, holy atmosphere that Viridiana was trying to maintain.
It pinpointed woodland near the hamlet of Pantyffynnon as the area where a vagrant, dubbed the "wolfman" by local children, was living rough.
The play shows how police were under pressure to move vagrants out of the city centre because of the eagerness of cities like Leeds to reinvent themselves according to now largely discredited ideas of progress.
"There were concerns that there could be a vagrant trapped inside the building," said a West Midlands Fire Service spokesman.
Notorious for their particularly virulent brand of white supremacy, Irish immigrants accounted for almost one-half of police station lodges and vagrants. Jacob Riis's disdain for his fellow tramps stemmed in part from his dislike of the 'Irishmen' with whom he was forced to share the road.
Reynolds occasionally draws "information" from vagrancy statutes as well as from rogue literature, and note that in the quotation above, Sharpe groups together "the statutes and the rogue literature" as twin sites of misrepresentation, twin sources of the erroneous impression that vagrants constituted a "universally subversive threat." As I argue in my book Vagrancy, Homelessness, and English Renaissance Literature (2001), which Reynolds nowhere cites, the similarities between official statute and trashy literature comprise more than an odd coincidence: rogue literature (the tabloid of its day) influenced statutes.
In just a few years, Jurgis watches helplessly as his wife and their two children die, while he becomes a vagrant, a thief, and an alcoholic.
These vagrant personifications of cultural moods and memories tug at viewers' own experiences and fill in the considerable blanks that stand in lieu of plot.
It had been thrown out by vagrant Robert Sinclair, 55, who became seriously ill while living rough in the house.
A recent law that bars police from rousting homeless people from Beijing has expanded the vagrant population in a city unused to street people.
I was getting into my new role as North Carolina's premier amateur philosopher and religious studies scholar, and hoping for some in-depth discussion of my own "anti-Christian bigotry," as one of the state legislators put it, no doubt referring to my description, in Nickel and Dimed, of Jesus as a "wine-guzzling vagrant and precocious socialist." On the "vagrant" part, there can be no debate, and, although "guzzling" may be a bit overstated, Jesus was sufficiently associated with wine ("I am the true vine," etc.) to be confused with the Greek wine god Dionysus in the Hellenistic world--a subject I have yearned to expound on for years.