vaginal atrophy


Also found in: Acronyms.

vaginal atrophy

[vaj′ənəl]
a postmenopausal condition of gradually declining tissue activity in the female reproductive tract. It is caused by a cessation of follicular inhibin and estrogen secretion. This leads to decreased negative feedback on the release of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone by the anterior pituitary gland. Tissue effects related to estrogen deficiency include atrophy and dystrophy of the vulva and vagina, pruritus vulvae, dyspareunia, cystourethritis, ectropion, and uterovaginal prolapse.

vaginal atrophy

A condition characterised by thinning, drying, and often dyspareunia and irritation of the vagina. Vaginal atrophy most commonly occurs in menopausal and postmenopausal women, and less commonly during breast feeding or in association with reduced oestrogen production in premenopausal women.

Management
Oestrogen creams.

vaginal atrophy

Atrophic vaginitis, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
Last year, the Food and Drug Administration approved Osphena (ospemifene) to treat vaginal atrophy related to menopause.
Intravaginal dehydroepiandrosterone (Prasterone), a physiological and highly efficient treatment of vaginal atrophy.
Vaginal atrophy can also be a serious effect of the menopause, although I think we're ashamed to talk about this.
A snapshot of the global therapeutic scenario for Vaginal Atrophy (Atrophic Vaginitis).
18, 2015 /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- The report " Vaginal Atrophy (Atrophic Vaginitis) - Pipeline Review, H1 2015" provides comprehensive information on the therapeutic development for Vaginal Atrophy (Atrophic Vaginitis), complete with comparative analysis at various stages, therapeutics assessment by drug target, mechanism of action (MoA), route of administration (RoA) and molecule type, along with latest updates, and featured news and press releases.
com/prnh/20130307/600769 Vaginal atrophy is defined as a decrease in estrogen production.
In fact, declining hormone levels can lead to vaginal atrophy -- around half of women say intercourse becomes so painful (because of thinning, fragile tissue) that they avoid it.
Fernard Labrie and coworkers at Laval University, Quebec, showed that intravaginal DHEA was highly and rapidly effective for the treatment of vaginal atrophy (Menopause 2009; 16:907-22), significantly improved the patients' libido and sexual function (Menopause 2009; 16:923-31) and did so with no suggestion of an increase in serum sex steroid levels (Menopause 2009; 16:897-906).
The main assessment criteria were sexual dysfunction parameters of libido, arousal, orgasm, and dyspareunia in postmenopausal women who have vaginal atrophy.
Very low dosages of transvaginal oestrogens in the forms of creams, tablets and rings are effective for vaginal atrophy and urinary incontinence.
The survey showed that nearly 39 pct of post-menopausal women experience these symptoms of vaginal atrophy and 40 percent agree that it interferes with their sex life.