vade mecum


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

vade mecum

[vā′dē mē′kəm]
Etymology: L, go with me
something carried by a person for constant use.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cyprian Norwid, Vade mecum Version 3 By Way of an Introduction (Universalities) When in spring of life the Artist's spirit Breathes in its air as would a butterfly, All he's allowed to say is this: The Earth is round--it's spherical
This incident prompted me to compile a vade mecum of wysiwig (what you see is what you get) words with appropriate daffynitions--Scrabble players are welcome to use them in comparable situations or--better still--invent their own and post them on the notice board at club nights (but I suggest you forgo the accompanying charade).
The tablet computer or similar device becomes the physician's vade mecum.
Interpreting statistics in medical literature: A vade mecum for surgeons.
The book is a true vade mecum for anyone interested in the institution of posadha in all its aspects, historical (origin and development of the posadha ceremony, and a critical survey of earlier research), comparative (with other Mulasarvastivada texts, and with parallel versions in other Vinaya schools), lexicographical (with extensive comments on a large number of Sanskrit and Tibetan terms), linguistic (declension, conjugation, and syntax of the language of Mulasarvastivada-Vinayavastu; prakritisms, hypersanskritization, deviations from classical Sanskrit), philological (including paleographical remarks on the Gilgit manuscript), etc.
Mandel has labored for years to research and write a book that is a model of historical, literary, and taurine research, a vade mecum for all readers of Death in the Afternoon, and surely one of the four or five most important books on our author.
If you don't, just realize that The Saturday Evening Post, that vade mecum of middle-class dreaming, has been replaced by House & Garden, Architectural Digest, and, heaven forbid, the Robb Report.
Although Metcalf hopes to provide an epitomic vade mecum for those in quest of alternative lifestyles, as well as to stimulate more sensitive and systematic investigation of a range of basic questions in political economy through a consideration of the formation and evolution of a selected group of intentional communities in Australia during the last twenty-five years, an academic American reader is more likely to find the volume's historical discussion of Australian utopianism from the late 1830s to the present more engaging.
The very absence of such delightful liberties probably makes Morrow and Francis a more reliable vade mecum for the unwary.
Quoting from calculations already made in his earlier The Apprentice's Vade Mecum (1733), Richardson explains that since plays generally begin at six and end at nine, 'here are Three Hours in every Day that the young Man goes to the Play (which is near a Fourth Part of it) stolen from the Master, and, as it may happen, turn'd to the worse Use that can be possibly made of it, both for Master and Servant'.
At its best The Civil War World of Herman Melville is a true vade mecum for future scholars who hope to fashion reams of cumbersome printed material into an intelligently managed and eminently readable work.
Perhaps less persuasively it is claimed that Paul had compiled his own anthology of Old Testament passages, either as the fruit of his own meditative reflection on Scripture or as a vade mecum useful in answering his opponents and/or responding to pastoral needs.