vacuum aspiration


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to vacuum aspiration: dilation and evacuation

aspiration

 [as″pĭ-ra´shun]
inhalation of some foreign material; aspiration of vomitus, blood, or mucus may occur when a person is unconscious or under the effects of a general anesthetic, and can be avoided by keeping the head turned to the side and removing all such foreign material from the air passages.
A, Types of aspiration. A, Aspiration before swallow caused by reduced tongue control. B, Aspiration before swallow caused by absent swallow response. C, Aspiration during swallow caused by reduced laryngeal closure. D Aspiration after swallow caused by pooled material in pyriform sinuses overflowing into airway. From Logemann J: Evaluation and Treatment of Swallowing Disorders, San Diego, College-Hill Press, 1983.
withdrawal of fluid by an aspirator; the method is widely used in hospitals, especially during surgery, to drain the area of the body being operated on and keep it clear of excess blood and other fluids to facilitate visualization of the surgical field. Sometimes after extensive surgery, suction drainage under the skin is used to speed the healing process.
meconium aspiration inhalation of meconium by the fetus or newborn, which may result in atelectasis, emphysema, pneumothorax, or pneumonia.
risk for aspiration a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which an individual is at risk for entry of gastric secretions, oropharyngeal secretions, solids, or fluids into the tracheobronchial passage.
vacuum aspiration a form of induced abortion in which the uterine contents are removed by application of a vacuum through a hollow curet or a cannula introduced into the uterus.

vacuum aspiration

n.
A method of abortion performed during the first trimester of pregnancy in which the contents of the uterus are withdrawn through a narrow tube. Also called suction curettage, vacuum curettage.

vacuum aspiration

Evacuation of the contents of the uterus by a curet or catheter attached to a suction apparatus. The procedure is performed before the 12th week of gestation. It is the most common form of surgical abortion. Synonym: suction aspiration
See also: aspiration
References in periodicals archive ?
(57.) Henshaw RC et al., Comparison of medical abortion with surgical vacuum aspiration: women's preferences and acceptability of treatment, British Medical Journal, 1993, 307(6906):714-717; and Winikoff B, Acceptability of medical abortion in early pregnancy, Family Planning Perspectives, 1995, 27(4): 142-148 & 185.
Two of these women underwent a manual vacuum aspiration after clinic staff identified an increase in uterine size consistent with an ongoing pregnancy at the follow-up exam (increased from six to nine and from seven to 10 weeks' amenorrhea, respectively).
However, the investigators note that their results are applicable to vacuum aspiration abortions up to 11 completed weeks of gestation.
(5.) Dao B et al., Is misoprostol a safe, effective and acceptable alternative to manual vacuum aspiration for postabortion care?
In some settings, the use of midlevel health practitioners instead of physicians to provide safe manual vacuum aspiration services has helped make uterine evacuations more accessible and available to women.
In 2000, 48% of all abortions were performed before seven weeks LMP, almost exclusively by electrical vacuum aspiration. (3) In 2006, around 56% of all abortions were at less than seven weeks and 21.8% of these early abortions were medical abortions with mifepristone and misoprostol.
Menstrual regulation was generally provided using manual vacuum aspiration, although some procedures were performed using electric vacuum aspiration (not shown).
It shows that it is safe and beneficial for suitably trained mid-level health care providers, including nurses, midwives and other non-physician clinicians, to provide first-trimester vacuum aspiration and medical abortions.
(22), (37) Many of these studies investigated operational aspects of the manual vacuum aspiration technique, and excluded patients with severe postabortion complications.
For the small number remaining, manual vacuum aspiration is available.
In the early 1970s he developed a soft, flexible cannula for manual vacuum aspiration that was widely used in the US and developing countries to perform early abortions.