vacuole


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Related to vacuole: contractile vacuole

vacuole

 [vak´u-ōl]
a space or cavity in the protoplasm of a cell.
contractile vacuole a small fluid-filled cavity in the protoplasm of certain unicellular organisms. It gradually increases in size and then collapses; its function is thought to be respiratory and excretory.

vac·u·ole

(vak'yū-ōl),
1. A minute space in any tissue.
2. A clear space in the substance of a cell, sometimes degenerative in character, sometimes surrounding an engulfed foreign body and serving as a temporary cell stomach for the digestion of the body.
[Mod. L. vacuolum, dim. of L. vacuum, an empty space]

vacuole

/vac·u·ole/ (vak´u-ōl) a space or cavity in the protoplasm of a cell.

vacuole

(văk′yo͞o-ōl′)
n.
1. A membrane-bound organelle in the cytoplasm of most cells, especially plant cells, containing water and dissolved substances such as salts, sugars, enzymes, and amino acids.
2. A small extracellular cavity or space within tissues.

vac′u·o′lar (-ō′lər, -lär′) adj.
vac′u·o·la′tion n.

vacuole

[vak′yo̅o̅·ōl]
Etymology: L, vacuus, empty
1 a clear or fluid-filled space or cavity within a cell, such as occurs when a droplet of water is ingested by the cytoplasm.
2 a small space in the body enclosed by a membrane, usually containing fat, secretions, or cellular debris. vacuolar, vacuolated, adj.

vac·u·ole

(vak'yū-ōl)
1. A minute space in any tissue.
2. A clear space in the substance of a cell, sometimes degenerative in character, sometimes surrounding an englobed foreign body and serving as a temporary cell stomach for the digestion of the body.
[Mod. L. vacuolum, dim. of L. vacuum, an empty space]

vacuole

A small, clear region in the CYTOPLASM of a cell, sometimes surrounded by a membrane. Vacuoles may be used to store cell products or may serve an excretory function.

vacuole

a membrane-bound compartment within the cytoplasm of a cell, containing cell sap, for example water, air, food. The central vacuole in the plant cell is surrounded by the TONOPLAST. see CONTRACTILE VACUOLE.

vacuole

clear space within cell cytoplasm, containing foreign material

vac·u·ole

(vak'yū-ōl)
1. A minute space in any tissue.
2. A clear space in the substance of a cell.
[Mod. L. vacuolum, dim. of L. vacuum, an empty space]

vacuole (vak´ūōl´),

n a clear space in the substance of a cell. It may stem from a degenerative process, or it may serve the cell as a temporary cell stomach for the digestion of a foreign body inclusion.

vacuole

a space or cavity in the cytoplasm of a cell.

contractile vacuole
a small fluid-filled cavity in the cytoplasm of certain unicellular organisms; it gradually increases in size and then collapses; its function is thought to be respiratory and excretory.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the culture revealed no growth, cytologic examination identified mononuclear phagocytes with cytoplasmic vacuoles containing structures consistent with bacteria.
Some authors have shown that vacuole is the consequence of chromatin condensation in spermiogenesis.
Characterization of a novel organelle in Toxoplasma gondii with similar composition and function to the plant vacuole.
The researchers stated that at early developmental stages the epidermal, endothecial and middle layer cells had prominent nuclei, large vacuoles, numerous rough endoplasmic reticula and mitochondria.
On the other hand, the Type 2 callus showed cells with dense cytoplasm, large vacuoles and large amounts of mitochondria (Figure 3C and D).
During the GTs final developmental stages, the vacuoles in some of the glandular cells increase in size and their protoplasts darkens; these changes are soon seen in neighboring cells, culminating in the cessation of synthesis activities and in GTs death that are caducous.
The bacterial protein Lem3 is positioned outside the vacuole and reverses the modification of the host protein to ensure that the protein "bricks" are free to be used in creation of the bacterial structure.
Mercier C, Adjogble KD, Daubener W, Delauw ME, Dense granules: are they key organdies to help understand the parasitophorous vacuole of all apicomplexa parasites?
Data suggest that the inhibition of water transport to the vacuole, followed by the loss of cellular turgor pressure is the main causes of the PD.
The centrally located vacuole occupies about 90% of the total volume of a mature plant cell and represents a cellular compartment that is of the major importance.
Typical organelles of a photosynthetic plant cell include the nucleus, vacuole, plastids, mitochondria, ribosomes, Golgi apparatus, lysosomes, glyoxysomes, and peroxisomes.