vacuole


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Related to vacuole: contractile vacuole

vacuole

 [vak´u-ōl]
a space or cavity in the protoplasm of a cell.
contractile vacuole a small fluid-filled cavity in the protoplasm of certain unicellular organisms. It gradually increases in size and then collapses; its function is thought to be respiratory and excretory.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

vac·u·ole

(vak'yū-ōl),
1. A minute space in any tissue.
2. A clear space in the substance of a cell, sometimes degenerative in character, sometimes surrounding an engulfed foreign body and serving as a temporary cell stomach for the digestion of the body.
[Mod. L. vacuolum, dim. of L. vacuum, an empty space]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

vacuole

(văk′yo͞o-ōl′)
n.
1. A membrane-bound organelle in the cytoplasm of most cells, especially plant cells, containing water and dissolved substances such as salts, sugars, enzymes, and amino acids.
2. A small extracellular cavity or space within tissues.

vac′u·o′lar (-ō′lər, -lär′) adj.
vac′u·o·la′tion n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

vac·u·ole

(vak'yū-ōl)
1. A minute space in any tissue.
2. A clear space in the substance of a cell, sometimes degenerative in character, sometimes surrounding an englobed foreign body and serving as a temporary cell stomach for the digestion of the body.
[Mod. L. vacuolum, dim. of L. vacuum, an empty space]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

vacuole

A small, clear region in the CYTOPLASM of a cell, sometimes surrounded by a membrane. Vacuoles may be used to store cell products or may serve an excretory function.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

vacuole

a membrane-bound compartment within the cytoplasm of a cell, containing cell sap, for example water, air, food. The central vacuole in the plant cell is surrounded by the TONOPLAST. see CONTRACTILE VACUOLE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

vac·u·ole

(vak'yū-ōl)
1. A minute space in any tissue.
2. A clear space in the substance of a cell.
[Mod. L. vacuolum, dim. of L. vacuum, an empty space]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Cytoplasmic vacuoles in SRSCT are negative for periodic acid-Schiff (PAS), Alcian blue, mucicarmine, Hale colloidal iron, Sudan III, oil red O, and Nile blue.
Although other works have mentioned the presence of granules (acidophiles) within parasitophorous vacuoles of several sizes in acidophilic RLO, they do not describe the sizes of the inclusions inside the parasitophorous vacuoles of infected cells (Meyers 1981, Wu & Pan 1999, Zhu et al.
Microvilli in this group was longer and numerous than other groups with the lower number of vacuoles. Round cortical granules with an electron dense and round appearance arranged as a layer beneath the plasma membrane with most density between groups (Fig.
Autophagic bodies or vacuoles containing mitochondria were observed in MeHg-treated embryos (Figures 4(a) and 4(b)).
Assessment of adipocyte formation was based on the staining of accumulated lipid vacuoles with Oil red O (Sigma-Aldrich).
Thin pleomorphic to elongate bacteria are present extracellularly (top left panel) and in cytoplasmic vacuoles within mononuclear phagocytes (top right and bottom panels).
However, only few studies attempted to characterize the sperm abnormalities associated with sperm head vacuoles after cryopreservation.
We further extended this study to observe the formation of autophagy vacuoles. BMDM were infected with R.
Morphometric analysis included measurements of the length of villi, crypt depth, mucosal thickness, and muscle layer thickness, as well as the presence of large vacuoles, as markers of enterocyte maturation.
Several proposed diagnostic criteria for IBM have been published with the European Neuromuscular Centre (ENMC) 2013 criteria and a relatively new, simple, and clinically useful set of criteria has been proposed that has high sensitivity and specificity and it includes finger flexor or quadriceps weakness, endomysial inflammation, and invasion of nonnecrotic muscle fibers or rimmed vacuoles [7].