vaccinia


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Related to vaccinia: smallpox, cowpox, molluscum contagiosum
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vaccinia

 [vak-sin´e-ah]
the cutaneous and sometimes systemic reactions associated with vaccination with smallpox vaccine. See also cowpox and paravaccinia.
vaccinia gangreno´sa generalized vaccinia with failure to develop antibodies against the virus (due to agammaglobulinemia), with spreading necrosis at the site and metastasis of lesions throughout the body.
generalized vaccinia a condition of widespread vaccinial lesions resulting from sensitivity response to smallpox vaccination and delayed production of neutralizing antibodies.
progressive vaccinia vaccinia gangrenosa.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

vac·cin·i·a

(vak-sin'ē-ă),
An infection, primarily local and limited to the site of inoculation, induced in humans by inoculation with the vaccinia virus, type species in the genus Orthopoxvirus (family Poxviridae) to confer resistance to smallpox. On about the third day after this vaccination, papules form at the site of inoculation, which are transformed into umbilicated vesicles and later pustules; they then dry up, and the scab falls off on about the 21st day, leaving a pitted scar; in some cases there are more or less marked constitutional disturbances. Because of the global elimination of smallpox, routine vaccination is not now practiced.
[L. vaccinus, relating to a cow, fr. vacca, a cow]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

vaccinia

(văk-sĭn′ē-ə)
n.
1. See cowpox.
2. The usually mild, cutaneous and sometimes systemic reaction in individuals who have been inoculated with smallpox vaccine.

vac·cin′i·al adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

vac·cin·i·a

(vak-sin'ē-ă)
An infection, primarily local and limited to the site of inoculation, induced in humans by inoculation with the vaccinia virus, type species in the genus Orthopoxvirus to confer resistance to smallpox. Because of the global elimination of smallpox, routine vaccination is not now practiced.
[L. vaccinus, relating to a cow, fr. vacca, a cow]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

vaccinia

A mild disease, acquired from the udders of cows, that causes blisters on the hands but no significant general upset. The disease is of historic importance. From knowledge of it, Edward Jenner developed vaccination against SMALLPOX. Also known as cowpox.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Zoonotic Brazilian vaccinia virus: from field to therapy.
The recombinant vaccinia viruses, VV-GMCSF-dGF and VVGMCSF-Lact, were constructed from L-IVP and purified as described previously [24].
Unintentional transfer of vaccinia virus associated with smallpox vaccines: ACAM2000 compared with Dryvax.
During the 1980s, vaccinia virus was explored as a vaccine vector for expressing rinderpest H-protein gene.
Lead researcher Dr Sepideh Gholami, from Stanford University in California, US, said: "The reason we used the vaccinia virus is it is a member of the small pox family, and, as we know, small pox vaccine has been given to millions of people to eradicate small pox.
'But as it turned out,' Malik says, 'vaccinia's K3L protein is actually quite ineffective against the human version of protein kinase R, which can adapt to discriminate between the viral K3L imitator and the true protein.'
Vaccinia virus is responsible for an important zoonotic disease affecting cattle and human beings in Brazil.
The incident underscores the need for lab workers who work with vaccinia virus to be vaccinated against smallpox, according to the study's authors, as well as to follow recommended safety practices.
There were no severe adverse events such as autoinoculation/contact inoculation, eczema vaccinatum, progressive vaccinia, generalized vaccinia, encephalitis, or the myopericarditis that has been "a major concern" in the U.S.
Scientists in Hong Kong and the United States have developed an experimental H5N1 bird flu vaccine for people by piggybacking it on the well-tested vaccinia vaccine that was used successfully to eradicate smallpox.
Researchers overcame that by using genetically engineered vaccinia, a relative of the smallpox virus, which spreads more easily in cancer tumors.