uterine gland


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uterine gland

Any of the tubular glands in the endometrium.
See also: gland
References in periodicals archive ?
Blastocyst is then brought closer to the uterine wall by a force generated from fluid reabsorption in the uterine glands [64].
As shown in Figure 4, Aroclor 1254-exposed wild-type and Wnt7a +/- uteri that had increased numbers of uterine glands at PND6 show a striking decrease in gland number at PND30, mirroring the phenotype observed in the DES-exposed uteri.
Secondary chorionic villi expand into vascular spaces and invade the mother's capillaries and uterine glands. The allantois forms the basis of the umbilical cord.
The uterine glands are simple, slightly branched tubular glands (Figure 5).
Trophectoderm cells also develop villous projections by d 13 that project into the openings of uterine glands during the third week of gestation.
Sections of this mucosal epithelium invaginate deep into the lamina propria-submucosa to form uterine glands, which secrete mucus, lipids, proteins, and glycogen into the lumen of the uterus.
The surface epithelium invaginated into the underlying lamina propria, forming uterine glands (Figure 1).
Either the absence of the uterine glands or the oviducts' abnormality would be sufficient to guarantee sterility.
A passing loss of appropriate regulation in very young animals leads to reproductive changes--for example, in the number of uterine glands or the thickness of the myometrium, the uterus's muscular outer layer--that give way to more pronounced changes through life.