uterine gland


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uterine gland

Any of the tubular glands in the endometrium.
See also: gland

uterine

pertaining to the uterus; see also endometrium, endometrial.

uterine abscess
most common in cattle and in dorsal wall due to injury during insemination or intrauterine therapy for infertility or instrumental obstetric manipulation.
uterine accommodation limited
may contribute to flexural deformities of limbs especially in foals; obesity of the dam may contribute to the limitation.
uterine artery rupture
occurs during parturition, and often accompanies uterine prolapse in cows. There is marked mucosal pallor and death occurs quickly due to hemorrhagic anemia. In mares, rupture of the middle uterine artery causes hemorrhage, colic, and often, death.
uterine caruncle
see uterine caruncle.
uterine cervix
see cervix uteri.
uterine discharge
copious, foul-smelling discharge in postpartum septic metritis in cows; thick, white, small volume discharge in endometritis.
uterine displacement
includes torsion, downward deviation in sows, inguinal and ventral hernia, prolapse.
uterine distention
palpable per rectum in cows, mares, through the abdominal wall in cats and dogs; pregnancy the common cause, pyometra, accumulation of secretions in imperforate hymen rarely. Pregnancy distinguishable in cows and mares by presence of membranes, or cotyledons in cows or fetus or fremitus in middle uterine artery.
uterine downward displacement
occurs in deep-bodied, pregnant sows with large litters and dystocia results.
uterine expulsive deficiency
see uterine inertia (below).
uterine gland
simple or branched, tubular glands extending into the lamina propria-submucosa; secrete mucus, lipids, glycogen, protein.
uterine horn
one of the pair of tubular extensions from the uterine body. Amongst the domestic species the horns are largest in those that bear many young (polytocous), e.g. sows, bitches, and shorter in those that bear single young (unitocous). Birds have two but only the left one is well developed or functional.
uterine inertia
primary, due to overstretching of the uterus or toxemia or obesity, or secondary, due to exhaustion, lack of myometrial contractions.
uterine infection
uterine involution
return to normal size after the delivery of the fetus.
uterine involution failure
common sequel to normal parturition in aged, high-producing cows, especially those suffering from milk fever or ketosis; metritis is a common sequel.
uterine lochia
see lochia.
uterine malformation
includes uterus didelphys, uterus unicornis and segmental aplasia of any part of the tubular organ.
uterine milk
secretions of the uterine endometrium in the early part of pregnancy; sustains the fetus until placental attachments are fully functional.
uterine mucosa
endometrium.
uterine neoplasm
uncommon but fibroleiomyoma occurs in bitches, leiomyoma and lymphosarcoma in cows.
uterine prolapse
see uterine prolapse.
uterine rupture
occurs usually during parturition and due to human intervention. Repairable if recognized but may lead to peritonitis.
uterine sand
dry, inspissated granules, yellow in color, found occasionally on the exterior of the bovine placenta. Probably derived from blood leaked into the lumen of the uterus in early pregnancy.
uterine stump granuloma
chronic inflammation due to infection or nonabsorbable sutures used in closing the stump after ovariohysterectomy.
uterine swab
swab of the uterus for bacteriological and virological examination for pathogens likely to adversely affect fertility. Used in fertility maintenance of mares.
uterine torsion
torsion of the body of the uterus in cows and mares and of a horn of the uterus in the sow. Causes dystocia characterized by the nonappearance of any part of the fetus in the vulva. Occurs rarely in dogs and cats.
uterine tube
a slender tube extending from the uterus to the ovary on the same side, conveying ova to the cavity of the uterus and permitting passage of spermatozoa in the opposite direction. It is mostly suspended in a fold of peritoneum (mesosalpinx) that may enclose a cavity (ovarian bursa). It terminates at the ovarian end in a dilated funnel (infundibulum). Called also fallopian tube and oviduct.
When the mature ovum leaves the ovary it enters the fringed opening of the uterine tube, through which it travels slowly to the uterus. When conception takes place, the tube is usually the site of fertilization.
uterine tube occlusion
may be congenital, or constricted by scar tissue in chronic peritonitis; a rare cause of infertility.
References in periodicals archive ?
As shown in Figure 4, Aroclor 1254-exposed wild-type and Wnt7a +/- uteri that had increased numbers of uterine glands at PND6 show a striking decrease in gland number at PND30, mirroring the phenotype observed in the DES-exposed uteri.
The uterine glands continue to nourish the embryo while the yolk sac is thought to aid in nutrient uptake.
Hormone disorders cause cystic hypertrophy of uterine glands leading to their hyperactivity, which favors bacterial infection.
Trophectoderm cells also develop villous projections by d 13 that project into the openings of uterine glands during the third week of gestation.
In ruminants, certain highly vascularized regions of the submucosa are devoid of uterine glands.
The surface epithelium invaginated into the underlying lamina propria, forming uterine glands (Figure 1).