uterine

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uterine

 [u´ter-in, u´ter-īn]
pertaining to the uterus.

u·ter·ine

(yū'tĕr-in, ū'ter-īn),
Relating to the uterus.

uterine

(yo͞o′tər-ĭn, -tə-rīn′)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or in the region of the uterus: the uterine canal; uterine contractions.
2. Having the same mother but different fathers: uterine brothers.
3. Being enclosed and dark; womblike.

u·ter·ine

(yū'tĕr-in)
Relating to the uterus.

uterine

1. Pertaining to the UTERUS.
2. Having the same mother but not the same father.
References in periodicals archive ?
In our study, preloading with 20ml/kg Ringer's Lactate solution, left uterine displacement, supplementation of oxygen via face mask and vasopressor agent inj.
It is necessary to provide pharmacologic and or mechanical thromboprophylaxis (31,32), and lateral uterine displacement should not be forgotten while the patient remains in supine position.
* It is important to perform lateral uterine displacement after the second trimester.
All three groups earned similar scores on questions relating to left uterine displacement during resuscitation and the 5minute cesarean rule.
Several measures have been advocated to decrease the severity of spinal induced hypotension like use of prophylactic vasoconstrictor, leg compression, trendelenberg position, left sided uterine displacement, but fluid preloading is commonly practiced (3-7).
But, in 1976, Clark et al (8), after observing hypotension as persistent problem, studied the combined effect of left uterine displacement and volume preloading on the incidence of hypotension and reported that fluid preloading alone or combination of fluid preloading and left uterine displacement is an effective means of controlling hypotension in parturients.
In 1959, Kennedy and coworker (5), found that relieving inferior vena caval occlusion by left uterine displacement could correct maternal hypotension prior to vaginal delivery under spinal anaesthesia.
Case series revealing that moving a woman from supine to a 45[degrees] left tilt or lateral position was an effective means of relieving the symptoms of aortocaval compression preceded the introduction of many different methods of uterine displacement. These included full lateral positioning; placement of folded sheets, waterbags, airbags, sandbags or rubber wedges under the hip or flank; tilting the operating table (l2) and mechanical or manual displacement (l3,14).