uterine atony


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uterine atony

failure of the myometrium to contract after delivery of the placenta; associated with excessive bleeding from the placental implantation site.

u·ter·ine at·o·ny

(yū'tĕr-in at'ŏ-nē)
Failure of the myometrium to contract after delivery of the placenta; associated with excessive bleeding from the placental implantation site.
References in periodicals archive ?
Obstetric complications include uterine atony and prolonged labour requiring caesarean delivery, whereas anaesthetic complications may result from medications used for general anaesthesia.
Compression sutures are most often used in the setting of refractory uterine atony. They also may be helpful for controlling focal atony or bleeding from a placental implantation site.
In 10(30%) patients EOH was performed for uncontrollable hemorrhage due to uterine atony, followed by a morbidly adherent placenta (28%).
Among different causes of PPH, uterine atony constitutes 45.9% and thought of as the leading reason for maternal mortality worldwide3.
Up-down determination of the ED (90) of oxytocin infusions for the prevention of postpartum uterine atony in parturient undergoing.
After the delivery of the baby, uterine stimulant medications (uterotonics/oxytocics) were administered during and after the cardiac operation to avoid the uterine atony. Cardiovascular surgery team started the operation after the obstetrician completed C/S.
The major causes of death from haemorrhage were bleeding associated with caesarean delivery (CD) (34.9%), uterine rupture (15.1%), abruptio placentae (12.9%), uterine atony (9.5%) and retained placenta (6.9%).
According to her clinical conditions, the cause resembled an amniotic fluid embolism resulting in disseminated intravascular coagulopathy and uterine atony. The multi-disciplinary clinical teams had already provided various resuscitative treatments, blood transfusion and medications; and
In our first patient who received Karateke packing, bilateral hypogastric artery ligation, and B-Lynch suture were performed via laparotomy due to postpartum uterine atony and there was no intra-operative bleeding.
Hence, resulting in less availability of glucose and calcium to uterine muscular tissues which proceeded as uterine atony and culminated to retained placenta (Mohanty et al., 1994).
Other indications were uterine atony 6 (19.4%) and uterine rupture 3 (9.7%).