usog


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usog

A culture-bound (“folk”) syndrome described in Filipinos, which is loosely equivalent to the Spanish mal de ojo superstition. Usog primarily affects infants and young children who have been greeted by a stranger; once affected, the child may develop fever and convulsions. Various cures are said to be effective, including boiling the child’s clothing or rubbing the stranger’s saliva on the child’s abdomen, shoulder or forehead. The only scientific explanation for this phenomenon may be that the child becomes extremely stressed by the stranger, resulting in extreme physical symptoms.
References in periodicals archive ?
This explains why the Babaylans can cure ailments related to kulam (witchcraft), usog, bati, naligaw na kaluluwa (wayward soul) among others.
Flushed with the success of the One Billion Rising campaign, protesting over violence against women, Lilith Usog says, "it is high time women's full participation and leadership in the church be recognized.
Carmelita Usog of the Philippines ends the volume with a call for "a complete reworking of values and outlook" (p.
Buyag, usog, hilo (to poison) and somebody else's gaze are believed to cause harm to a human body.
USOG also develops innovative technologies to increase oil and gas extraction with the smallest environmental footprint.
USOG plans to revolutionize "Green" oil and gas technologies with the smallest footprint.
We at the Cinema Evaluation Board gave Regal Films' horror film, 'Pwera Usog,' a grade of A.
For award-winning director Jason Paul Laxamana, the challenge of doing the horror flick, 'Pwera Usog,' was to effectively introduce an old concept like usog to the present generation.
Pwera Usog,' which will be shown in theaters nationwide starting March 8, also features Devon Seron, Albie Casino, Kiko Estrada, Cherise Castro, Aiko Melendez and Eula Valdes.
That is why when someone comments something like Ang cute cute ng anak mo, the child is always protected by its parent with the words puera usog.
Some in UP will go further and say brightest among the bright, but I worry about the boasting bringing usog, a folk illness, to our students.
But the term used in the Philippines for this phenomenon is not evil eye, but usog.