use

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use

 [ūs]
the applying of something to a specific desired purpose.
substance use substance abuse.
substance use (omaha) in the omaha system, a client problem in the health related behaviors domain, defined as the inappropriate consumption of medicines, drugs, or other materials including prescription drugs, over-the-counter drugs, street drugs, alcohol, and tobacco.

utilisation

The use or amount of usage (per unit population) of healthcare or other services; the pattern of use of a service or type of service in a specified time, usually expressed in rate per unit of population-at-risk for a given period—e.g., number of hospital admissions/year/1,000 persons enrolled in an HMO.

use

Vox populi Utilize. See Illegal use of controlled dangerous substances, Intravenous drug use, Misuse, Off-label use, Overuse, Substance use, Underuse.
References in periodicals archive ?
The RDV method is a rapid method for the direct determination of viral RNA sequences without using the eDNA cloning procedure.
She has mixed feelings about using the Internet in school:
Likewise, there were no significant changes in the proportions using oral contraceptives, IUDs, injectables or implants (32-34%); sterilization (24-25%); barrier methods (20-21%); withdrawal or rhythm (4-5%); or some other method (1%).
Finally, IBM and StorageTek each implemented compression in an ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) in their tape drives using compatible algorithms making the media interchangeable.
At first, I was going to have lotahs in all the stalls, but I didn't want people using them as a trashcan to throw garbage in.
I'd like to see [a company using this technology] start small and grow.
The disperGRADER, using a razor blade to cut the sample, requires no solvent; therefore, the swelling factor is eliminated.
Anesthesia was again performed in the same fashion using the N-tralig and Septocaine 4%.
With the cooperation of seven newspapers, Al Wong of Arbokem developed a test newsprint that was 68 percent de-inked old newspapers, 12 percent thermo-mechanical wood pulp (which is crushed with grinders using steam at high pressures and temperatures), 11 percent ryegrass straw pulp, six percent rice straw pulp and three percent red rescue straw pulp.
CPAs may find the reasonableness test to be the most subjective one taxpayers will have to defend when using business aircraft.
After looking at the investment schools have made in this technology, that more than 60 percent of high school students nationwide own a TI-83 Plus, and the numerous testimonials about how students enjoy using the device, it was obvious that we needed to find ways to help schools maximize their use.