urotherapy

urotherapy

An obsolete method for treating disease using urine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pharmacological treatment must only be considered if no improvement occurs after intensive adherence to at least six months of urotherapy [+ or -] biofeedback and constipation treatment.
Urotherapy is still popular, despite the invention of toothpaste.
Miljkovic, "Botulinum toxin type A in combination with standard urotherapy for children with dysfunctional voiding," Journal of Urology, vol.
They address the pathophysiology of bowel and bladder dysfunction; epidemiology, quality of life factors, psychological aspects, and neuropsychiatric disorders and genetic aspects; evaluation using urodynamics, uroflowmetry and postvoid residual urine tests, and other methods; behavioral, psychological, medical, and surgical treatments, including urotherapy, physiotherapy, biofeedback, pharmacotherapy, peripheral tibial nerve stimulation therapy, sacral nerve stimulation therapy, and botulinum toxin; the evaluation and management of nocturnal enuresis; and neurogenic bladder and bowel dysfunction.
A successful urotherapy can save a patient from excessive medical interventions and other alternative treatment options.
Urotherapy was also used by ancient Egyptians and indigenous Americans.
This study sets to determine the optimal duration of behavioral urotherapy necessary to achieve maximal improvement in the management of pediatric bowel and bladder dysfunction.
Throughout the ages many non-medical remedies have baffled both the medical community and laypeople alike: For example, urotherapy is the drinking of urine because it allegedly contains antibodies for cancer and AIDS; tiger phallus soup comes from traditional Chinese medicine and is consumed in order to boost a man's virility; and pearl powder is also a traditional Chinese medicine (Lin, 2010).
Urotherapy is a non-standardised term referring to non-surgical and non-pharmacological treatment of lower urinary tract dysfunction.
Essential to the overview are instances of poor sanitation, epidemics, and quackery and the efficacy of home remedies, mineral spas, urotherapy, patent tonics, barroom surgery, and extractors for arrows and bullets.
Dysfunctional Bladder in Children: Studies in Epidemiology and Urotherapy [dissertation].
Urotherapy, a nonpharmacologic and nonsurgical combination of cognitive, behavioral, and physical therapy with an aim to normalize micturition pattern, was done.