uropathogen

uropathogen

(ū″rō-păth′ō-jĕn) [″ + pathos, disease, suffering, + gennan, to produce]
A microorganism capable of causing disease of the urinary tract.
References in periodicals archive ?
A woman was considered to have a UTI if she had 105 cfu per milliliter or more of a uropathogen in a single sample of mid-stream--collected urine.
coli (40.89%) was the most frequently isolated baseline uropathogen and was identified in samples from nearly half of the population.
Proteus mirabilis (5.6%) was the third most common uropathogen. Interestingly, it was the most common cause of UTI among boys reaching a frequency of 32% compared to 27.5% of E.
Another key goal is to use an antibiotic that eradicates the uropathogen without causing harm to either the mother or fetus.
The uropathogen, Escherichia coli 33%, emerges as a predominant biofilm producer followed by Klebsiella 30%, Pseudomonas spp.
This uropathogen is the major extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producer, severely limiting the therapeutic management in cases of urinary tract infections [23].
Silver or nitrofurazone impregnation of urinary catheters has a minimal effect on uropathogen adherence.
The streamlined protocol markedly improved uropathogen detection, the authors wrote.
[4,5-11-17] Although there are no clear criteria for the diagnosis of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in neonates, [18] many clinicians use the following guide: growth of any urinary pathogen ([greater than or equal to] 1 000 CFU/mL) from a suprapubic specimen, or if a catheter specimen was taken, growth of [greater than or equal to] 50 000 CFU/mL of a single uropathogen, or between 10 000 and 50 000 CFU/mL of a single uropathogen with evidence of pyuria.
(18,22,26) An analysis of data on 186 patients with recurrent UTI enrolled in four RCTs comparing CAP and UTI prevention was reported by Selekman et al (26) The most common uropathogen was Escherichia coli (E.
coli was also the predominant uropathogen, and it was cultured in 65.5% of all samples from the entire study group.