Urodela

(redirected from urodeles)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to urodeles: Urodele amphibians

Urodela

the amphibian order containing newts and salamanders. They usually have a well-developed tail and four limbs, and have a larva with external gills.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Mescher, "The cellular basis of limb regeneration in urodeles," International Journal of Developmental Biology, vol.
Regeneration in Urodeles. http://www.biodavison.edu/ (accessed 7/06/2006).
Urodeles regenerate the spinal cord rather freely, either in the process of regenerating an amputated tail or in healing the cord if it is severed in the animal's body.
Yet Corsica and Sardinia are among the few islands where there are urodeles, cave-dwelling salamanders to be precise (four species of the genus Speleomantes [=Hydromantes] that live in different karstic massifs), and newts (two species of the genus Euproctus).
Consider the urodeles, a class of vertebrates that includes newts and salamanders.
Functional and developmental constraints and opportunities in the evolution of feeding systems in urodeles. Pp.
The HD larvae were also significantly more variable in size (see Results); Wilbur and Collins (1973) and Semlitsch and Caldwell (1982) also observed changes in size variability with increasing density in both anurans and urodeles. Expected fitness of HD focal larvae was probably also more variable than that of LD focal larvae (Semlitsch et al.
To our knowledge, there is still no report of cloning of aquaporins in urodeles or caecilians.
Recherches morphologiques et experimentales sur le determinisme des caracteres sexuels males chez les urodeles. Arch.
Reductions in numbers of mesopodial elements in urodeles result from: (1) failure of an element to form during development, (2) formation of an element but a failure to separate early developmental connections (typically resulting in an enlarged "combined" element) and (3) fusion of elements that are separate developmentally.
Many invertebrates and some lower vertebrates, such as urodeles and fish, have higher regenerative ability in a variety of tissues, such as the limbs, tail, heart, and spinal cord; these are tissues that never re-form in mammals when they are lost.
Lens regeneration is re-stricted among vertebrates, generally limited to some urodeles and anurans of the genus Xenopus (Henry, 2003; Tsonis et al., 2004; Henry et al., 2008; Henry and Tsonis, 2010).